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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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14 results for North Carolina, Western
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Record #:
14600
Abstract:
It isn't by accident that you will find more Republicans in the western part of North Carolina than anywhere else, and there are two very good reasons for it.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 43, Mar 1946, p3, 38
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Record #:
23745
Abstract:
The authors introduce important residents of Western North Carolina who hold fascinating jobs, such as trail clearers, tour guides, rock climbing instructors, and dog hikers.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 2 Issue 4, June 2008, p90-103, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
23786
Abstract:
Keith Snow is a chef in Tryon, North Carolina who pushes for the use of local produce and seasonal foods in cooking.
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Record #:
24199
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Abstract:
Amidst skyrocketing land values and a building boom, many fear that the tourism industry in the western highlands could suffer. Places like the Blue Ridge Parkway and Tweetsie Railroad have seen a decline in tourism the past couple of years.
Record #:
24198
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Abstract:
The author discusses the difficulty with balancing development and preservation in North Carolina's mountain counties, such as Jackson County, Swain County, and Henderson County.
Record #:
24279
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Abstract:
Charles Taylor is Western North Carolina's most powerful politician, having spent eight years in Raleigh and ten in Washington, D.C. This article presents his political career in North Carolina and his most influential impacts in the state.
Record #:
25510
Author(s):
Abstract:
The monthly Blind Pig Supper Club offers a secret menu and location inspired by ingredients grown in Asheville.
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Record #:
25520
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Abstract:
Researchers track golden-winged warblers from Western North Carolina to Central America to better understand this disappearing species. Research findings from the study shows that the loss in population is due to the disappearance of shrubby habitats. The loss in the Appalachian region is in part due to the conversion of agricultural lands to residential areas, changes in grazing practices to favor higher cattle densities, and land use for Christmas tree production.
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Record #:
25579
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Abstract:
Located southeast of Morganton, the Western Correctional Center is known to insiders as “The High Rise.” Considered North Carolina’s most secure prison for 14-to 18-year-olds, the 16-story fortress houses teenagers who are too young for adult jail or too old for juvenile school.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 5, March 16-29 1984, p1, 12-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Western North Carolina, Bee Tree Cover is listed as one of the 400 worst hazardous waste sites in the nation. Since 1951, the 1,200-acre area is used as a disposal site by four different industries, most recently by Chemtronics, Inc. The groundwater is contaminated with at least 82 chemicals known to be dangerous to human health.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 9, May 11-24 1984, p3, 8, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
25593
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Abstract:
Located in Transylvania County, the Horsepasture River (also known as “The Land of the Waterfalls”) is being considered a prime spot to build a dam to produce hydroelectric power. Environmentalists say the project would destroy the scenic and recreational value of the falls.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 16, Aug 31-Sept 13 1984, p3, 5, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
25634
Author(s):
Abstract:
A forest of red spruces and Fraser firs covers 72,000 acres of land atop the North Carolina mountains. The spruce-fir ecosystem is dying due to poisons man has put into the air that often fall back as acid rain.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 20, November 8-21 1985, p1, 8-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31116
Abstract:
Carolina Planning regularly publishes a feature highlighting projects from members of the North Carolina Chapter of the American Planning Association (NCAPA). This year’s submissions focus on community planning initiatives that utilize a wide range of collaborations, ranging from updated citizen engagement techniques, partnering with the NC Department of Transportation to slow traffic and create a pedestrian street environment, and a variety of intergovernmental collaborations.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 39 Issue , 2014, p43-51, il
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