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12 results for North Carolina--Economic development
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Record #:
5188
Abstract:
The Bill Lee Act gives tax credits and incentives to businesses that create jobs, invest in worker training, purchase new equipment and machinery, and invest in research and development. Rafferty discusses the achievements and criticisms of the bill during its five-year history.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 9, Sept 2001, p16,18-25, il
Record #:
9404
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North Carolina has a region that can fit whatever need relocating businesses or people need, whether it is a strong education system, mild climate, central location, or a technological center. Harris discusses what each of the following state regions has to offer: Advantage West, Charlotte, Piedmont Triad, Research Triangle, Northeast, Southeast, and Eastern.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 8, Aug 2007, p12, 14-16, 18-33, il
Record #:
9490
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With Forbes magazine designating North Carolina as the best state for business and Site Selection magazine rating the state's business climate No. 1 for five of the last six years, North Carolina is a leader in growing established business and attracting new ones. Low tax rates, business incentives, and workforce training are important factors in selling North Carolina. Harris examines economic development in several of the state's regions.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 9, Sept 2007, p31-34, 36, 38, 40, il
Record #:
10261
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Abstract:
In this second annual relocation guide, NC Magazine examines what makes North Carolina a great state for business, including business climate, education, government cooperation, transportation and quality of life.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p9-20, il
Record #:
13639
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North Carolina's Unique Foundation Program allows citizens to go into partnership with the state in the business of bidding for brains.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 21, Oct 1951, p3-4, f
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Record #:
16697
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Economic incentives have helped companies relocate to the state and others in-state to expand. Jordan discusses three major state-level programs that provide incentives: the Job development Investment Grant (JDIG), One North Carolina Fund, and Article 3J Tax Credits. Other incentive programs beyond the big three are discussed.
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Record #:
18822
Abstract:
Due to a unique public and private partnerships initiated by the North Carolina, the state's historically significant architectural heritage may have a better chance of surviving. Municipal and commercial interests will seek to breathe new life into North Carolina communities by matching potential investors with development opportunities that are encouraged to rehabilitate and use historic properties.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 49, Apr 1984, p1, 10, f
Record #:
24199
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Amidst skyrocketing land values and a building boom, many fear that the tourism industry in the western highlands could suffer. Places like the Blue Ridge Parkway and Tweetsie Railroad have seen a decline in tourism the past couple of years.
Record #:
24198
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Abstract:
The author discusses the difficulty with balancing development and preservation in North Carolina's mountain counties, such as Jackson County, Swain County, and Henderson County.
Record #:
29812
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Abstract:
At the end of the two-year long recession, North Carolina will emerge well-positioned for the future. Although recovery will be slow, the balance of industry and education puts the state in a position to prosper in terms of jobs created and reallocation of resources to new areas of technology and manufacturing.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 5, Jul/Aug 2009, p18-19, por
Record #:
29818
Abstract:
There are large economic development projects happening in each region across North Carolina. In the western part of the state, broadband availability is becoming a distinct advantage in the mountains, and companies like AdvantageWest are providing faster and safer access to data transfer. In the Charlotte region, computer giant Apple located a $1 billion data center that employs full-time technology positions. Increased demands on military have made opportunities in the eastern region of the state and companies are looking to leverage military influx with major development. In the northeast, a growing aviation cluster is prompting the development of infrastructure for aviation centers and regional airports, while in the southeast a growing concern with environmental conservation is prompting economic development based on the use of recyclables and byproducts. In the Piedmont Triad, trucking has added a jolt of development with the relocation of Mack Trucks, Inc. corporate headquarters to Greensboro, North Carolina. In the Research Triangle innovation is the word and partnerships with cluster-based companies are creating an upswing in economic development.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 6, Sept/Oct 2009, p8-10, 12, 14, 17, por, map
Record #:
32232
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Abstract:
A study entitled, “The Economic Performance of North Carolina,” is the first of its kind ever produced by and for state government. The report discusses North Carolina’s economic trials and triumphs since 1960, and offers proposals for guiding state economic growth during the coming decade.
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