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11 results for Acid rain
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Record #:
35
Abstract:
This study measured the approximate amount of calcium and magnesium ions released in dogwood leaves when treated with synthetic acid rain.
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Record #:
25634
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Abstract:
A forest of red spruces and Fraser firs covers 72,000 acres of land atop the North Carolina mountains. The spruce-fir ecosystem is dying due to poisons man has put into the air that often fall back as acid rain.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 20, November 8-21 1985, p1, 8-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26505
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Scientists from the U.S. Forest Service have found a strong correlation between acid rain and a disease which has killed thousands of dogwood trees across the United States. Indications are that it will spread considerably throughout North Carolina and the South in the near future.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p5, il
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Record #:
26636
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Abstract:
Acid rain threatens the nation’s ducks by limiting the production of young ducks and destroying critical food organisms that are needed by egg-laying females and ducklings. The black duck, an eastern species, is particularly vulnerable because they exclusively breed in heavily impacted areas.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 4, July/Aug 1987, p8, il
Record #:
26711
Author(s):
Abstract:
Highly acidic rainfall is common in North Carolina’s Great Smokey Mountains. The National Wildlife Federation supports pending legislation calling for sulfur dioxide emission reductions to help control acid rain.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 3, May/June 1984, p7
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Record #:
26897
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In North Carolina and other eastern states, acid rain is polluting streams and killing fish. John Rider, a fisherman from West Virginia, is trying to repair his local stream with a contraption he calls a stream sweetener. The device releases powdered limestone into the stream to neutralize the acid in the water and help trout survive.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 5, May 1982, p3-11, por
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Record #:
26950
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Abstract:
Acid rain is one of the significant environmental problems we face in this decade. The University of North Carolina, School of Journalism will undertake an in-depth polling of residents throughout the state to determine public concerns and knowledge of current levels of acid rain.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Nov/Dec 1982, p2
Record #:
26957
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Abstract:
Rains with an acidity of vinegar are now common throughout North Carolina and other eastern states. While numerous studies have outlined the problem of acid rain and its effects, there has been little effort to actually address the acid rain issue. Legislation is needed, not more studies.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Nov/Dec 1982, p10
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Record #:
26757
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The acid rain poll was conducted as part of the Carolina Poll in October 1982. Results indicate that North Carolinians believe acid rain is a serious issue and that they support tighter controls on power plant emissions causing the problem.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1983, p5
Record #:
26768
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Abstract:
A National Wildlife Federation study released last fall found that North Carolina and other eastern states are extremely vulnerable to the harmful effects of acid rain. In particular, both fisheries resources and the soil were found to be at greatest risk.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1983, p9, map
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Record #:
26870
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Wildlife Federation listed North Carolina as a state extremely vulnerable to the harmful effects of acid rain. The harsh acidity levels put fisheries and soil at risk.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 12, Dec 1981, p12, il
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