NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Forest ecology
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
24840
Author(s):
Abstract:
Melissa Dowland recounts her experience with three different types of large mammals in Eastern North Carolina. Dowland describes her various encounters with black bears, otters, and bobcats and the signs that told her they were nearby.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p2-3, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
25634
Author(s):
Abstract:
A forest of red spruces and Fraser firs covers 72,000 acres of land atop the North Carolina mountains. The spruce-fir ecosystem is dying due to poisons man has put into the air that often fall back as acid rain.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 20, November 8-21 1985, p1, 8-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2204
Author(s):
Abstract:
Most common in the Coastal Plain, headwater forests develop at the beginning of creeks and streams and are the most numerous of the state's wetlands. While not diverse biologically, they have the greatest effect on water quality of all the wetlands.
Full Text:
Record #:
40536
Author(s):
Abstract:
Living at Linville Gorge’s cliff are plants revealing ancient ecosystems long unknown and trees a retired Appalachian State professor believes are a millennium old. Support for his perspective of cliffs, which include their ecological as well as geological aspects, is a profile of the Table Mountain Pine, in addition to plants like Rock Tripe Lichen and Mountain Golden Heather.
Source: