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17 results for Transportation--Planning
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Record #:
99
Author(s):
Abstract:
In order for major cities, like Charlotte, and regions, like Research Triangle Metropolitan Area, to actualize their potential, a sound strategy for linking land use policies and development with public transit services must be developed and implemented.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 1991, p23-26, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
101
Author(s):
Abstract:
Allen profiles several options for more efficient and effective transportation.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 1991, p32-25, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
1997
Author(s):
Abstract:
The three transportation directors from the Triad cities of High Point, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem work cooperatively rather than individually in dealing with transportation problems and policy making.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Nov 1994, p12-16, il
Record #:
25753
Author(s):
Abstract:
THE INDEPENDENT investigates the lack of regional mass transportation usage and how to encourage ridership in the Triangle.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 13, July 2-15 1987, p9, 14-16, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26812
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the Federal Highway Administration and the Department of Energy, states can help citizens save gas and money by synchronizing traffic signals. This is a more efficient system to keep a maximum amount of traffic flowing. Another big gas saver is the law allowing right turns on red, now legal in every state.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 6, June 1981, p2
Record #:
27162
Author(s):
Abstract:
At last week's public hearing, dozens of mostly white residents effusively praised Wake County's transit plan. African-Americans in Southeast Raleigh, however, don’t believe they will benefit from the plan. Most of those who rely on city buses say the transit system has been expensive, inequitable, and unreliable for years.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 21, May 2016, p10, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27206
Author(s):
Abstract:
Anthony Foxx, U.S. Secretary of Transportation and former mayor of Charlotte, spoke at the Raleigh Convention Center for a forum hosted by WakeUp Wake County. Foxx emphasized that Wake’s transit plan will be crucial to managing growth in the region. He also praised the county for its motto promoting an all-inclusive community.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 25, June 2016, p6, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27216
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Abstract:
The proposed Durham-Orange County Light Rail is a three-decade effort in the Triangle. While many city officials are in favor of the system, there are a number of questions about the wisdom of the current plan, how it will be funded, and whether it will serve the people who need it. An enhanced busing system could be a more effective, flexible, and cheaper option.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 26, June 2016, p12-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27363
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article describes the process of creating a mass transit system within the Triangle area connecting Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, the three major universities, and the airport. The system will run buses on routes through the Triangle area and debate has started over the need or lack thereof for a rail system to connect the Triangle. The article also explores the history of the transit movement, the people who opposed it, and how the system will be paid for through a vehicle registration tax.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 28, July 1991, p6 Periodical Website
Record #:
27415
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Triangle area is becoming more bike-friendly. Improvements are being made in Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill/Carrboro for bikers. The Transportation and Improvement Program has allocated $1 million dollars for bike projects across the state. Biking reduces pollution, promotes exercise, and reduces the cost of vehicle maintenance and transportation.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 21, May 22-28 1991, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
27442
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Triangle Transit Authority (TTA) is looking to implement an efficient public transportation system in the Triangle area. Options include building a rail system or transportation by bus. The main problem is that TTA is unfunded and politicians can’t agree on how to fund it or what to do about the transportation problem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 10, March 8-14 1990, p7-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27464
Author(s):
Abstract:
If passed, a transit referendum will quadruple bus service and revamp Wake County’s public transportation system over the next ten years. This would introduce rapid bus transit, commuter rail, local circulators for the municipalities, and express service across the county.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 39, Oct 2016, p11-14, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27510
Abstract:
Some of the Triangle’s biggest issues from the past year are slowly being resolved. Updates to the major news stories since they were first printed are covered. These include the zoning issues in Orange County, traffic congestion in the Triangle, public transportation in the Triangle, downtown development in Raleigh, the merging of Durham’s schools, and the survival of the ArtsCenter in Carrboro.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 50, December 12-18 1990, p10-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28092
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Special Transit Advisory Commission discussed their vision for commuter rail and enhanced bus service in the Triangle area. The group discussed the three corridors they though should be used for the 2020 plan. The group also discussed how they would raise money for the plan through an increase in the sales tax, some support from property taxes, and some support from the state. Additional topics discussed by the group are detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 3, January 2008, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
29785
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislators, business leaders, and logistical experts across North Carolina are coming together to discuss the impact of transportation challenges on the state and its business community. The panel seeks to set recommendations and propose solutions for issues of taxes and infrastructure.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 2, Feb 2009, p24