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Record #:
11815
Abstract:
H. Lester Creech is president and chief executive officer of Carolina Coach Company with headquarters in Raleigh. The company was founded in 1925 with a single route between Raleigh and Greensboro. The company now operates over 3,800 scheduled miles in six states on the Eastern Seaboard utilizing 115 terminals. The company employs 520.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 37 Issue 8, Aug 1979, p15-16, 18-19, il, por
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Record #:
12485
Abstract:
William C. Steele is the new president and CEO of Carolina Coach Company, the country's third-largest interstate bus carrier. Though the company has declined in the past decade, Steele is seeking to restore it through improving service and image, cutting costs and route duplication, and looking for way to use the company's 225 buses profitably.
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Record #:
23269
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Abstract:
Chapel Hill's bus transit system has been free to riders since 2002 but is now considering charging fares.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 1, January 2015, p11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27363
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The article describes the process of creating a mass transit system within the Triangle area connecting Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, the three major universities, and the airport. The system will run buses on routes through the Triangle area and debate has started over the need or lack thereof for a rail system to connect the Triangle. The article also explores the history of the transit movement, the people who opposed it, and how the system will be paid for through a vehicle registration tax.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 28, July 1991, p6 Periodical Website
Record #:
22705
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Abstract:
In the 1920s, North Carolina became known as the Good Roads State, with concrete highways connecting large cities, county seats, and major institutions via a peak in bus companies. By the 1930s, three large bus companies emerged: Queen City Coach Company (Charlotte), Carolina Coach Company (Raleigh), and Camel City Coach Company (Winston-Salem). With steady growth and finance, these companies became part of then national networks for Trailways and Greyhound.
Record #:
31460
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Abstract:
The city keeps adding new public transit, but CATS buses remain vital to getting Charlotteans where they need to go. Just ask someone who rides them every day.
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