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12 results for Wood products
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Record #:
6891
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pete DeVita is president and CEO of Wilmington-based Cape Fear Riverwood Corp. The company recovers from the bottom of the Cape Fear River centuries-old logs that were floated downriver by loggers from the late 1700s to early 1900s. Many of the logs sank along the route and are rare old-growth cypress, loblolly pine and longleaf pine between three and five hundred years old. Once cut, the wood is used in flooring, furniture, and house building.
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Record #:
7631
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington-based Cape Fear Riverwood recovers from the bottom of the Cape Fear River centuries-old logs that were floated downriver by loggers from the late 1700s to early 1900s. Many of the logs that sank along the route are rare old-growth cypress and heart pine between three and seven hundred years old. Once cut, the wood is used in flooring, furniture, and house building. The wood is popular because of its hue, incredibly tight grain, age, and rarity. Since the company was found in the 1990s, around 25,000 logs have been reclaimed. The company estimates that around one million logs still lie on the river bottom, so there is no danger of ever running out of material.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p96-98, 100-101, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9351
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington-based Cape Fear Riverwood Corp. recovers centuries-old logs from the bottom of the Cape Fear River. Loggers from the late 1700s to early 1900s floated them downriver. Many that sank along the route are rare old-growth cypress, loblolly pine and longleaf pine between 300 and 700 years old. Once cut, the wood is used in flooring, furniture, and house building. The old growth wood is more desirable because it is stronger, yet softer on the feet when used as flooring, and has more interesting growth patterns. The seven-year-old company was purchased sixteen months ago by a group of investors.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 2007, p46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11392
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Abstract:
Turning House Millworks, located in Landis, converts long-abandoned mills and factories into building materials. The company is able to reuse or recycle 98 percent of the material from deconstructed buildings, and in so doing, saves thousands and thousands of trees. In April 2009, at the High Point Market, the company introduced its furniture collection made from rare and extinct vintage wood rescued from the old buildings.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 3, Aug 2009, p76-78, 80, 82-84, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11432
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Abstract:
Turning House Millworks, located in Landis, and its sister company, Turning House Furniture in Bassett, Virginia, convert long-abandoned non-historic mills and factories into building materials. In so doing, the company saves thousands and thousands of trees. The company recently introduced its furniture collection made from rare and extinct vintage wood rescued from the old buildings.
Record #:
19078
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington-based Cape Fear Riverwood Corp. recovers centuries-old logs from the bottom of the Cape Fear River. Loggers from the late 1700s to early 1900s floated them downriver. Many that sank along the route are rare old-growth cypress, loblolly pine and longleaf pine between 300 and 700 years old. Earley describes how the logs are found and then processed. Once cut, the wood is used in flooring, furniture, and house building.
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Record #:
29259
Abstract:
For many North Carolina homeowners, the use of wood instead of fossil fuels is a simple, old-fashioned, yet innovative way to beat rising energy prices. This article describes various types of woodstoves and the best available woods in North Carolina.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p14-16, por
Record #:
30113
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With the drain upon resources caused by World War II, research in the United States is turning to ways in which to utilize wood waste. Made from sawdust and other waste, products such as clothing, tires, protein feeds, and naval stores can be created to replace traditional wood industry products.
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Record #:
30737
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For seven generations, Max Woody and his family have handcrafted chairs and other furniture in Marion, North Carolina. This article discusses their woodworking tradition and chairmaking techniques.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 42 Issue 1, Jan 2010, p16, por
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Record #:
31321
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North Carolina's forests constitute one of its major environmental resources. Many of the best known industries in the state rely on products made from wood from the 20 million acres of state woodland. Forty-five percent of all manufacturing plants in the state utilize the fast forest products and account for an annual payroll in excess of $270 million.
Record #:
35798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wise proposed that logs belonged not in a fireplace, but on a homestead. To boost his argument that it was a viable residential alternative, he noted the speed in which a log cabin could be constructed (with modern tools such as a chain saw, it could be built in a month, that is). Added were its virtues as an efficient source of insulation and architectural source of rustic charm.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p
Record #:
35893
Abstract:
It was an enlightened response to the energy crisis, educating about an eco-friendly fuel source. Cited were virtues of stoves and types of burners. Observed were good tree types. To remove danger from a daring alternative, provided were books like Using Coal and Wood Burning Stoves Safely and Barnacle Parp’s Chain Saw Guide. As for reasons not prosaic, highlighted were activities generating what he called the “aesthetic charm” of the fireside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p14-16