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8 results for Trees--North Carolina--Registers
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Record #:
3030
Author(s):
Abstract:
The NORTH CAROLINA REGISTER OF BIG TREES lists the tallest trees in each of the 240 species in the state. Located in Robbinsville, in Graham County, the tallest tree overall is a Pignut Hickory at 190 feet.
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Record #:
12081
Author(s):
Abstract:
Minerals and organic materials have leached out of the soil in North Carolina's coastal lowlands due to shallow roots and heavy rains resulting in the destruction of local forests. A multi-million dollar experiment in Dare County aims to address the deforestation issue by replanting trees that will in turn, serve as commercial forests.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 6, Aug 1956, p16-17, il
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Record #:
12155
Author(s):
Abstract:
The majestic Longleaf Pine has been used to fill a variety of needs within North Carolina. This article discusses the various uses and industries locally associated with pine trees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 16, Dec 1956, p9-10, 19, il
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Record #:
12859
Author(s):
Abstract:
C. M. Haithcock is the leading advocate in tree preservation and conservation. The foremost tree expert in North Carolina, Haithcock knows the locations of the state's biggest, oldest, and most distinguished trees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 13, Nov 1959, p11, 16, por
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Record #:
9636
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to many large trees, and sixteen have been recognized as national champions. Besides these sixteen, the state has sixty-five state champions, each representing the largest of its species. These are listed in the North Carolina Register of Champion Big Trees.
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Record #:
28677
Author(s):
Abstract:
A photoessay survey’s the state’s old-growth forests from the mountains to the sea. Photographs of the forests and trees provide a look at what North Carolina looked like before it was settled. Photos of Eastern hemlocks, live oaks, American holly, bald cypress, longleaf pine, Fraser magnolia, chestnut oaks, and tulip poplars are pictured.
Record #:
34716
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina hosts approximately 31 National Champion trees listed on the Big Tree Program. Species include the longleaf pine, water oak, flowering dogwood, bald cypress, and silky camellia. Also detailed is the process of finding these champion trees and how two men have added significantly to the list.
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Record #:
35770
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mountains were a valuable part of NC, the author proclaimed, initially measuring this value in the types of precious stones to be found in ranges such as Pisgah. Discussed later was their greatest source of wealth—the people. Such people included those there before the arrival of English settlers, such as the Cherokee. Such people included the generations of immigrants and present day resident of Appalachia. The author concluded that collectively they helped to make the area what it became.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p27-28,45