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11 results for Longleaf pine
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Record #:
3210
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The longleaf pine, the official state tree, has endured much in history. The naval stores industry in the 1800s reduced its numbers, and 20th-century fire control has allowed other trees to crowd it out. Now special preserves are helping it to recover.
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Record #:
11629
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Melanie Walter of Wilmington creates baskets from an unusual material. Walter, an accomplished clay artist, uses needles from the longleaf pine for her basketry.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 5, Oct 2009, p152-154, 156, 158, 160, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
12155
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The majestic Longleaf Pine has been used to fill a variety of needs within North Carolina. This article discusses the various uses and industries locally associated with pine trees.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 16, Dec 1956, p9-10, 19, il
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Record #:
24471
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Brunswick County’s Green Swamp Preserve is rich in ecologically diverse plant life. Much of the original longleaf pine forest has been depleted, and the Preserve helps educate visitors on the importance of protecting this ecosystem.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 5, October 1991, p15-18, il
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Record #:
729
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The vast forests of longleaf pine that once covered the Coastal Plain are gone forever, but landowners are rediscovering the virtues of our state tree.
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Record #:
727
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Once, longleaf pine forests dominated Eastern North Carolina. Today, only remnant stands of our official state tree remain.
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Record #:
877
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Controlled forest fires, especially in the spring and summer, are critical to the health of the longleaf pine ecosystem.
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Record #:
3340
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Aubrey Shaw was the seventh generation of his family to live on their land near Roseboro. His ancestors harvested the longleaf pine for naval stores. He was probably the last North Carolinian to continue the work, prior to his death in 1995.
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Record #:
8053
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Lee describes his attempt to create a small but virtually self-sustaining stand of longleaf pine that will support many species of longleaf dependent birds and terrestrial animals. The longleaf restoration is part of a larger effort to restore a 130-acre tract of land that Lee and his wife own in Bladen County to make it more favorable to native wildlife.
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Record #:
28240
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Ecological research aimed at determining optimal conditions for longleaf pine regeneration has become increasingly important in restoration efforts. A study in the Croatan National Forest, North Carolina suggested that increased litter accumulation near trees can adversely affect seedling survival by increasing fire intensity.
Record #:
34389
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The abundance of Longleaf Pine trees in North Carolina offered a much-needed resource in the colonies where a flow of goods depended on shipping. Tar, pitch, and turpentine were also essential exports. By 1840, North Carolina produced almost ninety-six percent of all naval stores in the country.