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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Mountains--North Carolina
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Record #:
12804
Author(s):
Abstract:
A natural phenomena existing in the southern Appalachians, balds refer to sparse expanses of grass on mountain sides.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 6, Aug 1960, p10-12, il
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Record #:
13113
Author(s):
Abstract:
Containing an image showing the peaks of the Black Mountain Range of North Carolina, this article briefly discusses the geography and activities present in the region.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 24, Apr 1957, p24-25, il
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Record #:
13885
Abstract:
The least known and least visited of the mountain ranges in North Carolina; the Unicois Mountains are located along the southwestern border of North Carolina and Tennessee. The highest peak within the Unicois Range is Huckleberry Knob, rising 5,580 feet in altitude.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 52, May 1953, p27-28, il
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Record #:
13883
Abstract:
Forming the border between Yancey County, Madison County and Tennessee, the Bald Mountains of North Carolina stretch some 25 miles in length and exceed 5,000 feet in altitude.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 52, May 1953, p22-24, il
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Record #:
15009
Author(s):
Abstract:
General Thomas Clingman was the first to explore the Great Craggies, noted for their scenic beauty - and their inaccessibility. During recent years they have had few visitors, other than nearby residents, but today, by foot or on horseback, visitors arrive in droves, especially during rhododendron season.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p1-2, f
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Record #:
19752
Abstract:
Arnold Guyot was a Swiss trained geographer who came to America in 1848. He studied the southern Appalachian Mountains for a little over ten years between 1849 and 1860, trying to understand the complexities of these mountain ranges. A map and copy of Guyot's work in the western portion of the state during the summers of 1856, '58, '59, and '60 are reprinted in this article with a brief introduction to Guyot and his project to record the southern Appalachians.
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Record #:
23553
Author(s):
Abstract:
The authors highlight some of the most popular areas to visit in the nearby North Carolina mountains.
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Record #:
16187
Author(s):
Abstract:
Federal projects in the mountains created employment opportunities, places of research, and parks for the nation's citizens. The National Climatic Data Center opened in 1952 and preserved the nation's weather records. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park opened the Southern Appalachians to the nation and the United States Forest Service managed another 1,000,000 acres of natural resources in the region.
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Record #:
30163
Author(s):
Abstract:
Known for years as the Black Brothers, Mt. Craig and Big Tom mountains near Mt. Mitchell, are the last of the Black Mountain peaks to be officially named by the Federal Board of Geographical names. Soaring nearly as tall as the peak of Mt. Mitchell, Mt. Craig and Big Tom can only be explored on foot given their range of forbidding forests.
Record #:
35770
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mountains were a valuable part of NC, the author proclaimed, initially measuring this value in the types of precious stones to be found in ranges such as Pisgah. Discussed later was their greatest source of wealth—the people. Such people included those there before the arrival of English settlers, such as the Cherokee. Such people included the generations of immigrants and present day resident of Appalachia. The author concluded that collectively they helped to make the area what it became.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p27-28,45
Record #:
35775
Abstract:
Encounters of the UFO kind were common in NC, the author revealed; in fact, NC was fourth in the nation for this phenomena. To explain the frequency, Smith suggested factors such as magnetic disturbances, geological faults, electrical generating plants and transmission lines, military bases, mountains and water. As for explanations of their presence, they range from scientific to spiritual. Included as additional support for their importance included statistics on the percentage of Americans who believe in UFOs, governmental organizations that study this phenomenon, and photos of sightings NASA has declared genuine.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p14-15, 54-55
Record #:
35861
Author(s):
Abstract:
This mountain range, known for possessing the two highest peaks and occasional wind speeds of over one hundred mph, had purported purposes ranging from the practical to peculiar. Speculations included worship sites for Native American tribes and command and observation posts for the military.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p65