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35 results for Abernethy, Edgar
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Record #:
14496
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Uwharries Mountains are located mainly in Stanly, Montgomery, and Randolph Counties. These little mountains aren't very high, but all the same, there's a quiet loveliness about their gently rounded contours which gives them a charm all their own.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 4, June 1945, p4-5, 22, f
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Record #:
14550
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Polk County's scenic beauty encompasses manmade and natural features noteworthy for both the county and the state. The author draws upon observations made while on a recent trip through the county. Lake Adger and Pearson's Falls are two such distinct natural destinations. A few remarks are also included concerning some local history and culture, of particular note the house of Sydney Lanier, musician and poet in the 1800s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 2, June 1946, p6-7, il
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Record #:
14634
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David Crockett was born in what was then North Carolina and he spent part of his youth in the state before becoming an outstanding political figure in Tennessee and a hero in Texas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 1, June 1944, p6-7, 26, f
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Record #:
14644
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Missionaries in the Appalachian Mountains during the early 20th century were adamantly against liquor, specifically one man of the cloth Preacher Davis. The preacher lived in an area north of Asheville called Big Ivey in Buncombe County. Preacher Davis opposed the making of liquor not only in sermons but actively destroyed stills in the area. This active destruction nearly started a civil war with both sides arming themselves.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 35, Jan 1947, p3-4, 19, il
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Record #:
14645
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The various dams, such as the Mountain Island Waterpower Station, along the course of the Catawba River were built primarily for the purpose of generating power, but they also have been of tremendous aid in helping control the floods in that area from the often heavy rains.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 3, June 1944, p4-5, 21, f
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Record #:
14639
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Abstract:
The free Negro of ante-bellum days occupied an unenviable position in the South. In a system of white freemen and black slaves, he was an anomaly that was restricted and supervised by the courts, even in his freedom.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 2, June 1944, p6-7, f
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Record #:
14717
Author(s):
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Cane River is Yancey County's own private rivers. Not a single stream flows into the county or out of it, and there are many interesting and beautiful places to be found in the valley.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 18, Sept 1944, p8-9, f
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Record #:
14734
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Abstract:
Compared with bright leaf, there is not much difference in the process of cultivation of burley tobacco. But when it comes to harvesting - it's a plant of a different color.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 23, Nov 1944, p9, 18-19, f
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Record #:
14771
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Abstract:
Abernethy reminisces about a local tradition in Stanley, Gaston County called the \"Farmers' Picnic and Old Soldiers Reunion.\" The event's main functions served to honor and remember Confederate soldiers. Its secondary role provided Gaston County residents with a mid-summer social gathering. People arrived by car and train to partake of the festivities which included a parade, music, food, and closed with a baseball game.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 1, June 1943, p14-15, por
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Record #:
14780
Author(s):
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Abernethy takes us on a little trip through Rutherford, Polk, and Henderson Counties, describing the scenery along the way.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 32, Jan 1945, p4-5, f
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Record #:
14804
Author(s):
Abstract:
Inscriptions on ancient tombstones were an of an entirely different type 150 years ago, each of them expressing thoughts and feelings that shed light on the times.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 36, Feb 1945, p3-4, 22, f
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Record #:
14974
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Records pertaining to Valentine Derr illuminated living conditions in the state during pre-Civil War years. Valentine Derr was born 1795 and grew into a 'jack of all trades.' He farmed, mined, became a blacksmith and a merchant, and was the first postmaster of Stanley Creek. Derr owned a store in Lincolnton and ledgers from that store illuminated popular goods and prices for commodities through the 1830-1840s. Derr died November 20, 1872 but documentation from his past endeavors has lived and presented a piece of history otherwise lost.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 40, Mar 1944, p4-5, il
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Record #:
14975
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Abstract:
Jacob Forney Sr. was born in Alsace, a small region in eastern France, in 1721 and arrived in Philadelphia in 1739. He moved south and landed in what is now Lincoln County in 1754. During conflict with Native Americans, Forney gained a favorably reputation across the territory. His sons Jacob, Abram and Peter carried on the legacy both in military actions and politics. The Forney Family's local fame ended in 1834 when many of the siblings moved away to Alabama.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 41, Mar 1944, p1-2, 34, il
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Record #:
14981
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Doctors during the antebellum period dealt with illness despite a lack of general knowledge of disease and very few hospitals. Common antebellum diseases included dysentery, influenza, malaria, and small pox. Children were most susceptible to illness, for example the state reported 427 croup related deaths and 400 whooping cough fatalities. Those severely sick could not go to a hospital unless an individual's physician ran a private infirmary. Medical practices for the period relied on \"the 'four Ps' pukes, purges, plasters, and phlebotomy.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 48, Apr 1944, p4-6
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Record #:
15008
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steele Creeks is the largest rural Presbyterian Church in North Carolina and in all probability it may be the largest rural church of any denomination in the State. It is located in the western portion of Mecklenburg County and is one of the seven original Presbyterian churches established in Mecklenburg in colonial days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 42, Mar 1943, p4-5, 37, f
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