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6 results for Tobacco production
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Record #:
14734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Compared with bright leaf, there is not much difference in the process of cultivation of burley tobacco. But when it comes to harvesting - it's a plant of a different color.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 23, Nov 1944, p9, 18-19, f
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Record #:
19364
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bobby Hams is from Ham Farms in Greene County. This county ranks first in tobacco production in the state and second across the entire nation. Mr. Ham offered his insights for reducing the county's dependence on tobacco production and alternatives for diversifying agricultural output.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p83-88, il
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Record #:
29338
Author(s):
Abstract:
Anti-tobacco sentiment has risen since cigarette smoking was blamed for thousands of deaths each year. This year the federal government made substantive reductions in its support for tobacco, which has had tremendous economic, political, and cultural importance in North Carolina. Despite this, state politicians and tobacco spokesmen have responded with little protest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1981, p12-59, il, por
Record #:
31314
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s congressional delegation, along with members from other tobacco producing states, will be trying to cash in some green stamps this year as they try to save the federal tobacco program. Federal support of the tobacco industry is being criticized for the negative effects of tobacco on health, and faces competition with foreign markets and imported tobacco leaves.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Mar 1985, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
31562
Author(s):
Abstract:
A North Carolina State University study examined bulk curers on twenty-four farms in Red Springs of Robeson County to determine whether a load control program would adversely affect tobacco production and farmers’ attitudes. The study found that tobacco is completely unharmed when cured in bulk barns where the fans are automatically turned off for brief periods when demand for electricity is highest.
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Record #:
31563
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than half of North Carolina’s huge flue-cured tobacco crop is now cured in bulk barns. This milestone was reached in 1977 and the trend toward bulk barns is expected to continue. The main reason farmers have switched to bulk barns is to save labor, as well as energy.
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