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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Military bases
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Record #:
976
Abstract:
Oliver discusses each of the major military bases in North Carolina, the impact they have on the state's economy, and how that impact will be affected by the Clinton administration.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Mar 1993, p18-40, por
Record #:
3757
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's military bases - Fort Bragg, Camp Lejeune, Cherry Point, Seymour Johnson, and Pope - form a powerful part of the country's military might. When an American presence is needed somewhere in the world, many of these units are first to answer the call.
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Record #:
8457
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States military participates in a yearly joint exercise called Solid Shield. This exercise began in 1963 and occurs along the North Carolina coast and includes Camp Lejeune and Fort Bragg. The operation in 1983 included every branch of the American military and over 47,000 soldiers. The exercise has evolved over the years and currently is based on the scenario that a friendly nation is being subjected to outside intervention from a third country resulting in governmental instability. The military's objective is to offer military assistance and restore order for the friendly government. The author observes Solid Shield from the deck the U.S.S. Inchon, a naval amphibious assault ship that carries twenty-eight helicopters and 2,000 Marines.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p8-10, por
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Record #:
14487
Abstract:
At the Laurinburg-Maxton base in Scotland County, glider pilots who flew in various theatres of war received their final training before leaving for overseas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 1, June 1945, p5-7, f
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Record #:
24780
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Abstract:
Nearby Fort Bragg has brought more people into Moore County, boosting its local and tourist economy in recent years. Following the 2011 Base Realignment and Closure Plan that closed three Georgia bases, Fort Bragg’s numbers increased to about 45,000 military personnel and their families. Surrounding counties, including Moore County, took in the influx of people.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, January 2016, p97-98, 100, 102-103, 105-107, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25504
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Abstract:
During World War 11, Camp Montford Point in Jacksonville served as the segregated training camp for the first African-American Marines. The Marine Corps was the last branch of the military to accept African-Americans. The Montford Camp Marines broke down racial barriers for future African-American recruits.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 6, November 2015, p32-35, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
31152
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina hosts more military bases than any other state, including the Army’s Fort Bragg and the Air Force’s Pope Air Force Base. The electric system at the military bases is powered by Sandhills Utility Services, a utility company formed by four Touchstone Energy cooperatives. This article discusses how the electricity system was designed and developed, and the special electric requirements of military operations.
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Record #:
35775
Abstract:
Encounters of the UFO kind were common in NC, the author revealed; in fact, NC was fourth in the nation for this phenomena. To explain the frequency, Smith suggested factors such as magnetic disturbances, geological faults, electrical generating plants and transmission lines, military bases, mountains and water. As for explanations of their presence, they range from scientific to spiritual. Included as additional support for their importance included statistics on the percentage of Americans who believe in UFOs, governmental organizations that study this phenomenon, and photos of sightings NASA has declared genuine.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p14-15, 54-55
Record #:
36302
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the road to making life easier for injured military members is autonomous vehicles. Getting this type of vehicle closer to this destination—being completely driverless—is the testing measures. As for the wounded warriors’ destination, in place already is the system’s communication methods to help them make and keep their appointments.