NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


15 results for Fort Bragg
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1934
Abstract:
The deaths of several babies born with abnormalities at Fort Bragg led one mother to discover a common link - the babies' parents had been exposed toxins during the Persian Gulf War.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 38, Sept 1994, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2072
Abstract:
Each year in May the 82nd Airborne Division, stationed at Fort Bragg in Fayetteville, holds a public, week-long celebration that pays tribute to over fifty years of service of America's only paratrooper division.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 12, May 1994, p40-41, il
Full Text:
Record #:
10434
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the next five years, ending in 2013, Fort Bragg, in Cumberland County, will grow by 2,600 active-duty military personnel and 2,000 civilian employees. Counting family and other individuals, the county population will expand by 27,000. Zulovich discusses how this growth will affect public education, transportation, health care, and housing.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 10, Oct 2008, p58-60, il
Record #:
17101
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brigadier General William Bryden is the new commanding general at Fort Bragg, the nation's largest field artillery post.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 1, June 1938, p3, por
Full Text:
Record #:
18280
Abstract:
This article describes the construction that is going on at Fort Bragg near Fayetteville. Since last September 2,739 structures have been built. The 99 percent completion rate, says the writer, \"is just about as close as construction work will ever be completed at the Fort, because there will always be some building going on.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 8, July 1941, p10-11, 23-25, il
Full Text:
Record #:
22737
Author(s):
Abstract:
The unique regional alliance between Fort Bragg and Fayetteville, North Carolina has encouraged growth and allowed residents a means of addressing issues concerning their communities.
Source:
Administration of Justice Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. Issue , May/June 2012, p61-63, por, map
Record #:
23093
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since it was built in the 1930s, the 852nd Airborne Divarty home on Fort Bragg has been home to many army families. Currently the Morettis live there. This article takes a tour of their home and discusses family history as well as life at Fort Bragg.
Source:
CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , May/June 2015, p22-28, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
24141
Author(s):
Abstract:
Troop buildup and new Army commands at Fort Bragg created a boost in the economy and an economic windfall for surrounding communities.
Record #:
24595
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author presents an overview of North Carolina during World War I, especially at Fort Bragg in Fayetteville, North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 15, December 1964, p9-10, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cumberland County has been in the mainstream of military, commercial, and political events for 225 years. It is the home of Fort Bragg and boasts the furthest inland port. It has also received the largest concentration of Scotch Highland settlers ever to migrate in such a short time to America. The author provides an anecdotal history of the area and its overall importance to North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 20, March 1959, p10-12, 26, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24780
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nearby Fort Bragg has brought more people into Moore County, boosting its local and tourist economy in recent years. Following the 2011 Base Realignment and Closure Plan that closed three Georgia bases, Fort Bragg’s numbers increased to about 45,000 military personnel and their families. Surrounding counties, including Moore County, took in the influx of people.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, January 2016, p97-98, 100, 102-103, 105-107, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25613
Author(s):
Abstract:
From sunup until sundown there are 45,000 soldiers training to fight at Ft. Bragg. They are known as the 82nd Airborne. Writer Steve Schewel profiles the division of highly-trained soldiers ready to win The Next War.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 5, March 15-28 1985, p1, 12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24718
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article highlights Lieutenant General John William Leonard and discusses his achievements over his 36 continuous years in the Army. Lieutenant General Leonard presides over Fort Bragg’s operations.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 8, July 1951, p8, 21, por
Full Text:
Record #:
33199
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three hundred civilian observers will relay information of local enemy movement to Fort Bragg during extensive military operations which will take place this fall (1938).
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 13, Aug 1938, p1, 16, por
Full Text:
Record #:
35625
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town named from a Revolutionary War general was a study in contrasts. It was home to attractive houses and unattractive city sprawl, a NC town with deep English colonial roots and Asian, Greek, and Italian communities. It became home to 30,000 plus veterans returning post retirement, often the same soldiers who resented their time at Fort Bragg. It had experienced much recent business growth in the past two decades, evident in businesses such as the convention-motel entertainment complex. Nevertheless, an economic home base could be found in the old part of the city, particularly in places like the Market House.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p20-22, 37-41