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9 results for Fort Bragg--History
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Record #:
8272
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Abstract:
During the World War II military buildup, Fort Bragg faced a big problem. On the base stood a massive balloon hangar built during World War I. Needing space to expand, military officials wanted the building torn down. The building's sturdy construction and heavy timbers, however, ensured that completing the job would be no easy task. In 1941 a solution naturally occurred as the building burned down. Firefighters were quick on the scene, but they allowed the building to burn while ensuring onlooker's safety. The cause of the fire was found to be old wiring.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p13-14, por
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Record #:
12192
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In an effort to make service life as attractive as possible to reduce turnover, non-commissioned officers of the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg are providing themselves with a million dollar N.C.O club. The Department of the Army has granted a $500,000 loan to finance the project to be paid back in quarterly installments from operating proceeds. Aside from the club with dance floor, lounge, and restaurant, the facility will include a pool, tennis court, nursery, and guest motel units.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 7, Sept 1958, p37, il
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Record #:
14601
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A post-war Fort Bragg differed greatly from a pre-World War II fort. During worldwide conflict approximately 100,000 men were stationed there but in 1946 a mere 30,000 soldiers still occupied the fort. Reduction in troop numbers also led to changes in base infrastructure. Reductions led to repurposing fort facilities during peaceful post-war years which included expanding weapons testing acreage.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 19, Oct 1946, p3, 20-21, il
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Record #:
15413
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Five years ago General Manus McCloskey became commandant at Fort Bragg, the largest military post in the world. Since then, many changes and improvements have been made that include new administration buildings, a hospital, chapel, and other structures.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 14, Sept 1936, p1-2, f
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Record #:
22742
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At the beginning of a new century, the 1908 flood and the 1918 opening of Fort Bragg changed life in Fayetteville forever.
Source:
CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , October 2012, p54-55, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24141
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Troop buildup and new Army commands at Fort Bragg created a boost in the economy and an economic windfall for surrounding communities.
Record #:
24595
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The author presents an overview of North Carolina during World War I, especially at Fort Bragg in Fayetteville, North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 15, December 1964, p9-10, il
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Record #:
34850
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During World War I, Sandhills Airfield was used in order to train artillery brigades. It became an official post in 1922, renamed Fort Bragg. It also becomes the home of the 82nd Airborne.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 10, March 2018, p68-74, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35577
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Abstract:
The armed force’s importance in the Coastal Region was represented in attesting their positive impact. Economic impact was felt in towns such as Morehead City, and in the purchase of goods, on and off base, by the over ninety thousand military members and their dependents. As for their social impact, it was best expressed in helping to repair churches and coaching community little league teams. It was proof that the greatest impact couldn’t be measured in dollars and cents.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p22, 25-26