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12 results for Fayetteville--History
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Record #:
18999
Abstract:
The Marquis de Lafayette had been invited by Congress to return to the United States in recognition of his status as the last surviving general of the American Revolution. Lafayette accepted and returned in 1824. After sojourning a while in Washington, D.C., he commenced his southern tour. Everywhere he traveled thousands of people greeted him and tried to show him how much the American people loved. This article describes his visit to Fayetteville, the first city named in his honor.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 45, Apr 1943, p1, 13-14, il
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Record #:
22741
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Abstract:
From the founding of Cumberland County in 1754 through the establishment of Fort Bragg in 1918, the city of Fayetteville has a long and eventful history.
Source:
CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , October 2012, p50-53, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24432
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Abstract:
Most of the focus on Fayetteville is about the bustle of Bragg Boulevard near the military base. A hidden gem, however, can be found in the city’s historic downtown, where colonial-style homes, and other historical markers, are located.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 8, January 1993, p24-29, il
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Record #:
24536
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Longstreet Presbyterian Church in Fayetteville, North Carolina is one of the oldest Presbyterian churches in the United States and was built in the 1750s by Scots. The author discusses its history and significance to North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 7, December 1977, p26-27, il
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Record #:
24595
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Abstract:
The author presents an overview of North Carolina during World War I, especially at Fort Bragg in Fayetteville, North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 15, December 1964, p9-10, il
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Record #:
21993
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Abstract:
A discussion of the life and career of the Marquis de Lafayette, with particular attention to his popularity and appeal to Americans and to North Carolinians in particular, as well as details of his visit to the North Carolina town of Fayetteville that was named in his honor.
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Record #:
22746
Abstract:
Fayetteville, North Carolina has been the birthplace or home of many African Americans over the city's 250 years. These citizens have contributed to the city and the world in the areas of education, medicine, music, civil rights, politics and government, and religion.
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Record #:
32946
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They were our first “improved” highways and were the forerunners of our modern (1945) highway transportation system in North Carolina. This article takes a look at and old contract from the Fayetteville and Western Plank Road Company for the construction of a seven mile stretch or road in Randolph County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 52, May 1945, p9, 20
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Record #:
34933
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Abstract:
Kienitz discusses the history of Fayetteville as told through the city’s street signs. Various roads change names as you drive through town, illustrating the many expansions and modifications the city has experienced over the years. Examples of different areas in town are included.
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Record #:
35625
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town named from a Revolutionary War general was a study in contrasts. It was home to attractive houses and unattractive city sprawl, a NC town with deep English colonial roots and Asian, Greek, and Italian communities. It became home to 30,000 plus veterans returning post retirement, often the same soldiers who resented their time at Fort Bragg. It had experienced much recent business growth in the past two decades, evident in businesses such as the convention-motel entertainment complex. Nevertheless, an economic home base could be found in the old part of the city, particularly in places like the Market House.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p20-22, 37-41
Record #:
35691
Author(s):
Abstract:
Its original name was the “Meeting House”: its latter name, Cape Fear Baptist Church, inspired by the nearby stream. A Colonial construction, this church in Gray’s Creek was touted as one of the first erected in Cumberland County. Its value was also asserted by an illustrious history: a temporary hospital and bivouac site for General Sherman’s troops.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p49
Record #:
36181
Author(s):
Abstract:
Explained by this local historian, whose work experience included museums and a library, were reasons for the layout of streets in Fayetteville. She concluded the layout can be confusing for even town natives. What was easier for her to explain were name origins for roadways such as Green Street and Ottis F. Jones Parkway.