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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Family farms
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Record #:
2480
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A number of farm owners want, upon their death, the family farm to pass on to their children. To insure a successful transfer, a well-planned will is essential, and a person should be designated to handle the business of the estate.
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Record #:
3107
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Small family farmers in the state find their prime money crop, tobacco, declining in price and marketability. To make ends meet requires finding alternate crops, like cotton or organic fruits and vegetables.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 16, Apr 1996, p13-15,17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
9761
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The number of people living on farms nationwide underwent a dramatic change in the hundred years between 1890 and 1990, dropping from 98 percent of the total population to 2 percent. Whitmire discusses how workforce and succession planning can also apply to the state's small family-farm businesses.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 72 Issue 2, Winter 2007, p34-42, il, f
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Record #:
23285
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The Vollmer Farm, located northeast outside of Raleigh, hosts activities and provides locals with produce. The Vollmer family is a proponent of community supported agriculture.
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Record #:
23552
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Charles and Dana Burrage discuss what it is like to live and work on their family farm, Windy Hill.
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Record #:
23788
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Family farms are becoming more popular. One example of this return to traditional ways of life is Joe Deal, who gave up his post-collegiate job to become a full-time third-generation farmer in Franklin County, North Carolina.
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Record #:
23805
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Three Days Grace is a family-owned goat farm in Madison County that helps bridge the gap between farm and table and provides locally-produced milk and cheese to the community.
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Record #:
29706
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The Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians has the oldest living agricultural tradition in southern Appalachia, and saving seeds is an important part of their food ways. Some of the families in North Carolina who still save seed and grow Cherokee vegetable varieties are the Bradley Farm in Big Cove, and the Long Family Farm and Gallery in Murphy.
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Record #:
30747
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Parker Family Farms in Orange County is run by Renee and Randall Parker and their four children. As fewer family farms continue to operate in North Carolina, the Parkers hope to save their farm and their agricultural heritage. Several local farming programs have helped the family continue to grow tobacco and raise pigs and chickens.
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Record #:
34277
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Isaiah and Annie Louise Perkinson manage Flying Cloud Farm in Fairview, North Carolina. The farm is known for its fields of flowers, which are connected to Annie Louise’s family history in England and Germany. From July through October, visitors to the farm can pick their own bouquets of flowers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p26-28, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34286
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Lacey Queen is a pig-and-cattle farmer with a small market store and a tiny barbecue joint, the Tin Shed, in Spruce Pine. She raises pigs using sustainable practices on the family’s Soggy Bottom Farms in Little Switzerland. This article describes Queen’s business and operations on the family farm.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p160-166, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34830
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The Justice family farm in Jacksonville, North Carolina is home to one of the last Christmas tree farms in the state. Since 1984, Willie Justice, the head proprietor, has helped families find the perfect tree and along the way, made lifelong friends and customers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p28-30, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36556
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Bee Branch Farm’s owner expresses a personal investment and interest in Sandy Mush’s farmland conservation efforts. Contributions of this native, ninth generation farmer and former high English teacher, include the Northwest Buncombe County Farm Heritage Trail and her farm’s production of vegetables and honey applying organic practices.
Record #:
35912
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Joe Warrell lent a hand in the creation of the monument on the narrator’s family farm. Perhaps a miracle, considering the habitual gesture that gave him miracle worker status in Betty Branch Church: middle finger extended upward.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p48-49
Record #:
38255
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An inherited farm in the town of Godwin synthesizes old and new for the benefit of its residents and the community. The current residents continue the farmhouse tradition, carried out in this Sampson County dwelling by Tom Jackson’s great-grandfather, albeit with a modern day twist. Jackson Farm’s organic offerings, identified by the author as niche crops, include herbs, edible flowers, and fruit trees. Other offerings are a retreat style guesthouse and backdrop for weddings.
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