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8 results for Agricultural diversification
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Record #:
2899
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Abstract:
Niche crops, or products raised for a specialized market, allow farmers to diversify their production. Niche crops include organic fruits and vegetables, and horticultural crops, including herbs, cut flowers, and native ornamentals.
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Record #:
2898
Author(s):
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In addition to traditional crops, like tobacco, farmers often plant crops, like specialty vegetables, to increase income. While diversifying crops, farmers must take care to distinguish between a marketable product and one that isn't.
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Record #:
3107
Author(s):
Abstract:
Small family farmers in the state find their prime money crop, tobacco, declining in price and marketability. To make ends meet requires finding alternate crops, like cotton or organic fruits and vegetables.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 16, Apr 1996, p13-15,17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4196
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the federal government's cancellation of basic commodities price supports in 1996, the state's farmers received lower prices for items including hogs, soybeans, and tobacco. The Specialty-Crops Program, started in 1997, seeks to develop niche crops for farmers to supplement lost income. Echinacea, a plant with healing properties, is being studied as a possible niche crop.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 12, Mar 1999, p13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7993
Author(s):
Abstract:
Morris describes five North Carolina farms where conventional crops were traded for alternatives uses of acreage. They are Spinning Spider Creamery, producing goat cheese in Marshall; Whistlepig Farm, growing specialty garlic in Asheville; Chapel Hill Creamery, producing cheese from grass-fed cows in Chapel Hill; Harbinger Lavender Farm, growing varieties of lavender in Harbinger; and Bradsher Sod Farm, growing fescue in Raleigh.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p136-138, 140, 142, 144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10188
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's Specialty Crops Program, which started in 1997, fosters specialty crop production. These niche crops, or products raised for a specialized market, such as truffles, allow farmers to diversify their production.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 6, June 2008, p28-30, il
Record #:
34384
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bertie County farmers are farming for industrial hemp through a pilot program sanctioned by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. The production of industrial hemp was made legal in 2015, as farmers are looking for alternative crops to grow. There is still much to learn about growing this new commodity, but industrial hemp may play a role in local farming’s future.
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Record #:
34886
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has been a good state for growing wheat in for centuries. But now, there is a renaissance occurring for heirloom grains. Small businesses including bakers, wheat farmers, and millers have begun to work together in order to bring back traditional grains into bread recipes of the south.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p122-130, il, por Periodical Website
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