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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Yeomans, Jonathan
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Record #:
10007
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Abstract:
While North Carolina has many prominent women, these seven were chosen because of their dedication to their business and the surrounding community. They are Cynthia Marshall, Hilda Pinnix-Ragland, Fran Preston, Janice Brumit, Susanne Sartelle, Billie Redmond, and Susan Ivey.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 4, Apr 2008, p8-17, por
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Record #:
10184
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1986, Monica Doss went to work for the Council for Entrepreneurial Development, an organization formed by the North Carolina Department of Commerce. At that time the organization had no other employees, and membership was around 100 companies. Stepping down as CEO in May 2008, Doss leaves the largest entrepreneurial support organization in the nation, now with 20 employees serving over 5,000 members who represent 1,100 companies.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 5, May 2008, p44-45, por
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Record #:
10188
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Abstract:
The state's Specialty Crops Program, which started in 1997, fosters specialty crop production. These niche crops, or products raised for a specialized market, such as truffles, allow farmers to diversify their production.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 6, June 2008, p28-30, il
Record #:
10189
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dean Bundschu is CEO of PrepChamps.com, an innovate Wed site that helps high school athletes mass-market themselves to college coaches via e-mail, online profiles and video clips.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 6, June 2008, p50-51, il
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Record #:
10262
Author(s):
Abstract:
Butner is under consideration by the Department of Homeland Security as a location for its new Bio- and Agro- Defense Facility. The town is one of six national finalists, and a decision will be made by the end of the year. The $524 million complex would study livestock diseases that could threaten agriculture, food supply and public health.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p21-22, il
Record #:
10268
Author(s):
Abstract:
Marco Fregenal is CEO of Cary-based software company Carpio.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p56-57, por
Record #:
10488
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's professional sports teams--the Carolina Panthers (Football); Charlotte Bobcats (Basketball); Carolina Hurricanes (Hockey); and NASCAR racing--play a major role in the state's economy.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 11, Nov 2008, p10-12, il
Record #:
29658
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Abstract:
Once known for textiles and tobacco, North Carolina is now renowned for technology. From computers and software to pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, and research trials, top companies in technology and biotechnology are calling the state, particularly the Research Triangle Park, home.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 2, Feb 2008, p10, 12-15, por
Record #:
29653
Author(s):
Abstract:
Due to one of the state's longest and most severe droughts, North Carolina businesses have reduced their water consumption. New technologies for water recycling, low-flow faucets, and adjustments to irrigation systems are just some of the ways that companies have stepped up to save water.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p31-33, por
Record #:
29690
Author(s):
Abstract:
The demand for residential and commercial space in downtown Raleigh and Charlotte, North Carolina is rapidly increasing. To meet the demands, companies have capitalized on high-rise condominiums and mixed-use skyscrapers like the RBC Plaza and Wachovia First Street Cultural Campus.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p38-43, por
Record #:
29770
Author(s):
Abstract:
The biggest economic development in southeastern North Carolina will also create and new industry for the area. The GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy plant in Castle Hayne, North Carolina will expand its operations to include laser technology in order to extract uranium.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p28, 30, por, map
Record #:
29784
Author(s):
Abstract:
To put the fruits of research and technology into the hands of the public, North Carolina universities rely on technology transfer centers. These centers, a least a dozen in the state, help North Carolina university labs get their work patented, licensed, sold or transitioned to businesses, in order to help their communities with innovations.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 2, Feb 2009, p16-18, 20-21, il, por
Record #:
29812
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the end of the two-year long recession, North Carolina will emerge well-positioned for the future. Although recovery will be slow, the balance of industry and education puts the state in a position to prosper in terms of jobs created and reallocation of resources to new areas of technology and manufacturing.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 5, Jul/Aug 2009, p18-19, por
Record #:
29814
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thanks to the work of developer and entrepreneur John M. Jordan, the small town of Saxapahaw, North Carolina is experiencing a renaissance. As a life-long resident, Jordan has seen the town's old mills and mill villages crumble, but he is transforming them into affordable housing, apartments, and schools.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 5, Jul/Aug 2009, p23, por
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Record #:
29650
Abstract:
In North Carolina, the utilities industry is lifeblood for the state's economy. Energy companies are fundamental and the total revenues reported by state power companies reached $9.6 billion.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p20-22, por
Subject(s):