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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Livestock
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Record #:
14956
Abstract:
Within a twelve month period one of North Carolina's greatest wartime experiments has shown a profitable large-scale beef cattle, sheep, and hogs production in the low-income areas of the Coastal Plain section of the State at the Caledonia State Prison Farm, Tillery, North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 22, Oct 1942, p6-7, 16, f
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Record #:
16941
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With the movement away from tobacco in eastern North Carolina, McKinnie examines the alternatives, which include livestock.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p49-53
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Record #:
25195
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Concerns of both residents and local farmers were considered at the Environmental Management Commission. The hot topic was regulations requiring farmers to register farms with a certain amount of livestock.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 11 Issue 4, Summer 1992, p1
Record #:
26939
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The Interior Department did not appeal when a district judge gave cattle priority on a Montana wildlife refuge to allow livestock grazing. The National Wildlife Federation and the Montana affiliate are appealing the decision because they believe grazing will be detrimental to wildlife in the refuge.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p11, il
Record #:
30154
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The trend in livestock has added a permanent rejuvenation to farms in North Carolina. But not only do cows, which required green pastures, provide surface improvement, they are also putting money into North Carolina farmers' pockets. Increase in the value of cattle over the last decade has been due to an increase in the population, better breeds, scientific management, and healthy animals.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 9 Issue 3, July 1951, p10-13, 27, por
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Record #:
30158
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In an issue from U.S. News and World Report, the southern United States is experiencing a minor revolution. With new factories, modernized farms, new power and telephone systems, and new schools and hospitals, southern states seeing rapid change for the better. In particular, farms and farm incomes are increasing due to mechanical advancements and an emphasis on livestock.
Record #:
30253
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North Carolina's livestock farmers are facing a feed shortage. The upper Piedmont faces the largest threat with smaller, scattered areas also suffering from severe shortages due to drought.
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Record #:
30863
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Acre Station Meat Farm specializes as a butcher for hog and beef farmers who raise animals without steroids or antibiotics. By working with local farmers to create the custom meat cuts and unique value-added products that bring them business, Acre Station is helping to rebuild North Carolina’s local food economy.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 8, Aug 2009, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31061
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Even on the farm females are now the boss of the herd, but lack of male mates is resulting in better offspring. Recent refinements in artificial breeding are stirring up revolutionary trends in livestock. For example, in North Carolina, 35% of the dairy cows are bred artificially. The mechanisms of current artificial breeding utilize built-in insurance and use the best of the breeds, resulting in higher fertility and better animals, and it tends to be cheaper than traditional breeding that requires boarding of an animal.
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Record #:
34286
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Lacey Queen is a pig-and-cattle farmer with a small market store and a tiny barbecue joint, the Tin Shed, in Spruce Pine. She raises pigs using sustainable practices on the family’s Soggy Bottom Farms in Little Switzerland. This article describes Queen’s business and operations on the family farm.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p160-166, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34672
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During the Colonial period, sheep were popular livestock raised throughout Carteret County. The wool was used for home spun clothing while lamb and mutton were staples in the local diet. Sheep were so prevalent that Portsmouth Island was also known as “Sheep Island.”
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p5, map
Record #:
34751
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The island of Portsmouth, located 25 miles from mainland North Carolina, was valued for raising livestock. During the early 19th century, sheep, horses, cattle, and goats were reared by the small community. Storm activity in the early 1800s threatened the livestock on the island as it destroyed much of their grazing areas. Apart from these animals, the island served little agricultural purpose as only sweet potatoes were well adapted to the salty soil.
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Record #:
37828
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This is a report on screwworm fly damage to livestock with notes to deer as well. An outbreak in 1949 was the worst on record, most likely due to the mild winter temperatures.
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