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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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28 results for Farm products, Local
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Record #:
16877
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Ney discusses the advantages of buying food that is raised by local farmers. It is estimated the North Carolinians spend $35 billion per year on food purchases. If just 10 percent were spent locally, that would bring $3.5 billion into local economies and provide support to local farmers and provide jobs in the farming community.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Mar 2012, p18-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23597
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Cornelius's new restaurant, Fork! has a casual dining setting with simple, yet modern cuisine. Chef Tim Groody, a leader of Charlotte's farm-to-table movement, uses local, organic and natural ingredients in the prepared dishes.
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Record #:
23625
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From the minds of local chef Steven Goff and manager Peter Slamp comes King James Public House in Asheville. Serving pub fare--the expected and the experimental--the public house has become a neighborhood favorite.
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Record #:
23660
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Laurey Masterton is the owner of Laurey's Catering and Gourmet-to-Go, an Asheville-based business that makes use of local produce from farmers.
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Record #:
23842
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Since 1982, the Gwynn Valley Camp in Brevard has served as a summer camp for children. Residential and day camps, as well as 4-H programs use the camp to teach children about the farm-to-table process by encouraging interaction with farm animals, planting seeds, and harvesting vegetables.
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Record #:
23947
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Author Bruce Ingram discusses his locavore lifestyle, an emerging trend. The locavore lifestyle involves growing chemical-free food, hunting, fishing, raising livestock, and using natural energy like firewood and solar power instead of electricity. He urges North Carolinians to consider the lifestyle, or at least utilize local farmer's markets for fresh produce.
Record #:
24096
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Mother Earth Produce is a year-round delivery service that provides fruits and vegetables from local farmers to customers. The business is run by two people and encourages people to eat locally-grown food.
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Record #:
24737
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In April 2015, the Durham Co-Op Market—a community owned and locally sourced grocery store—opened in Durham. Originally, the board of directors planned to allow employees to purchase shares in the company, but the board is considering revoking this benefit. By offering employees the opportunity to buy shares, employees are guaranteed representation on the board, which board members fear may cause clashes in business operation.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 46, November 2015, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24746
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Starlight Café in Greenville serves high quality food and supports the farm to table concept. Most of the food served at Starlight Café is grown and raised at Starlight Farm and Gardens while additional food comes from nearby towns such a La Grange, Goldsboro, and Snow Hill.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 7, December 2015, p50, 52-53, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
24751
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In 2010, Andrew Frank, his wife, and his son began working on their now successful Duck Dance Farm in Burnsville. The farm breeds duck, geese, and fish, but does not sell the meat from these animals. Instead, they make a profit from the eggs the duck and geese lay. The family defines their farming philosophy as responsible and raises the birds as free range.
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Record #:
24808
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Briley’s Farm is a family owned farm providing produce to Greenville throughout the year and has been for 35 years. They host many activities throughout the year including pick your own strawberries in the spring, a corn maze, pick your own pumpkin, birthday parties, field trips, company retreats, and much more for everyone from children to adults.
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Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p48-55, il, por
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Record #:
27107
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B.Good is a New England-based franchise that opened its second Raleigh restaurant downtown in mid-March. B.Good has counter-only service has relies on local food sources only. Half of the menu features burgers and fries, while the other features quinoa-based bowls and salads.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 16, April 2016, p22, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27645
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The word “local” has become a meaningless word in the restaurant business in Charlotte. Many restaurants who only get a few of their ingredients from local farms claim the word to justify price increases. This practice has forced restaurants who only use local ingredients to change the way they express it, by saying “farm to table,” “sourced locally from North Carolina,” “farm-driven,” and other phrases to ensure customers know what they are purchasing.
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Record #:
28497
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In 2006, Chef Aaron Vandemark opened the restaurant Panciuto in Hillsborough, North Carolina. Each dish on Panciuto’s menu is sourced from neighboring farms, artisans, and friends, and Vandemark makes sure that these people are acknowledged and known.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 11, April 2017, p44-48, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28836
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Farm-to-table programs in the Triangle are trying to build a model that is economically viable for everyone, including farmers and their staff. According to advocates, the true community impact of restaurants doesn't stem from serving customers directly; rather, it depends on efficient infrastructure development and relationships.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 41, Oct 2016, p18-19, por Periodical Website
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