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13 results for Goodwin, Jack
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Record #:
8422
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author recalls family trips to visit his grandparents in Buxton. Goodwin's grandfather, James Oliver Casey, was a keeper of the lighthouse. Among his responsibilities was maintaining the light, which included carrying five gallons of kerosene to the top of the lighthouse each day. Goodwin remembers catching ferries across the inlet and driving across sand to Buxton. There were no roads at that time, and drivers were careful to avoid quicksand. If travelers were in trouble, the Coast Guard offered quick assistance. At his grandparent's home, Goodwin enjoyed large family meals that usually included seafood, such as fresh-caught fish, crabs, oysters, and scallops. The Outer Banks have changed since Goodwin's childhood. During the Great Depression, for instance, the Civilian Conservation Corps built dunes along the island and planted trees to stabilize the island's continuously shifting sands.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 12, May 1985, p19-21, il, por
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Record #:
34474
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carteret County Historical Society houses reproductions of drawings of Roanoke Island made by John White in 1585. White studied the Algonquin and Tuscarora Indians, and the subjects he depicted include fishing and agricultural practices, burial customs, personal adornment, and village construction. Scans of the drawings are included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p9-10, il
Record #:
34499
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of a 1918 letter detailing the first Atlantic Primitive Baptist Church. Formed in 1829, church members erected the structure which was destroyed in 1885. There were numerous delays in re-building as a central property could not be bought without difficulty in obtaining the title.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Fall 1993, p7-9, il, por
Record #:
34529
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clinton E. Lincoln was a resident of Morehead City in between 1854 and 1918. Lincoln patented two inventions during his residency—a sewing table and associated spool holder. The table is exemplary of innovative trends in 19th century daily life, as it would have improved household clothing manufacture. A copy of the patent letter is included in the article.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 3, Summer 1994, p3-5, il
Record #:
34566
Author(s):
Abstract:
Emeline Pigott was born and raised in Carteret County just outside Morehead City. Living near a Confederate encampment during her early twenties, Pigott served as a nurse and gathered information on Union movement for the Confederacy. Captured and imprisoned in 1864, Pigott was eventually released and moved to Morehead City following the Civil War. She became one of the founding members of the North Carolina chapter of Daughters of the Confederacy, established 1906.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Summer 1995, p3-4, il, por
Record #:
34586
Author(s):
Abstract:
County school records are a helpful research tool to those interested in Genealogy. Often, older records list the school age citizens within a geographic area as well as the achievements of those enrolled in local schools.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Summer 1995, p16-17
Record #:
34595
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses Carteret County Labor Statistics for the year 1893 as recorded for the State of North Carolina. The recorder, B.R. Lacy, believed labor statistics were vital to understanding the needs and services of working class North Carolinians. Interesting details of labor statistics in Carteret County in 1893 include a decrease in farming and farm enterprises and limited upward mobility for manual laborers.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 12 Issue 1-4, 1996, p40-41
Record #:
34592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whaling was a significant industry in early Carteret County. Harvested whale oil and bone sold at a high price. Goodwin provides some price comparisons recorded in the Carteret Court minutes of 1741.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 12 Issue 1-4, 1996, p25
Record #:
34601
Author(s):
Abstract:
This short article contains the transcription of a letter held in the Carteret County Historical Society archives. The letter is from a Raleigh official who asks for an increase in fish for the Governor and an unknown Asylum.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Summer 1999, p26
Record #:
34629
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of a 1920 newspaper article addressing Chautauqua in Carteret County. Chautauqua, an extension of Methodist camp meetings, was a congregational gathering which emphasized community strength and revitalization. The 1920 Chautauqua in Carteret County required additional funding from community members.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p18-19, il
Record #:
34654
Author(s):
Abstract:
Various autograph books are housed in the Carteret County Historical Society. The earliest, dating to the 1860s, contains inscriptions from friends and family. Autograph books were a popular pastime for young people and often express their sentiments towards peers.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p18, il
Record #:
34677
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parent-Teacher Associations (PTAs) throughout Carteret County raised close to $3,000 for Country school improvements in 1927. The funds, which came from fundraisers and membership fees, were used to buy library books, maps, pianos, and Victrolas for school use. Other allocations include building repairs and school supplies.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p19, il
Record #:
34672
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Colonial period, sheep were popular livestock raised throughout Carteret County. The wool was used for home spun clothing while lamb and mutton were staples in the local diet. Sheep were so prevalent that Portsmouth Island was also known as “Sheep Island.”
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p5, map