NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Carteret County--Industry
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
14840
Abstract:
Fisheries and opportunities stemming from fisheries constituted the bulk of Carteret County's industry. Centered in Morehead City, business focused on fishing included the Wallace Fisheries, Carteret Fish and Oil Company, Gordon C. Willis Company, and R. R. Barbour and Otis Purefoy. The Bell-Wallace Shipyard specialized in ship repairs for the government and the Morehead City Port Terminal was run by the Navy. A non-water related industry was the M. H. Willis Lumber Company.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 13, Aug 1943, p16-20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
34601
Author(s):
Abstract:
This short article contains the transcription of a letter held in the Carteret County Historical Society archives. The letter is from a Raleigh official who asks for an increase in fish for the Governor and an unknown Asylum.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Summer 1999, p26
Record #:
34729
Author(s):
Abstract:
In July, 1917, construction was completed on the breakwater at Cape Lookout. Measuring over two miles in length, the breakwater was built to create safe anchorage for vessels. The breakwater itself is approximately 50 feet in height and constructed from North Carolina granite. Nearby facilities include a Coast Guard Station. While the breakwater was being built, there were numerous other additions to local infrastructure including a new school house, an increase in farms and farm acreage, and creation of new Menhaden fish factories.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
34742
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1914, Orion Knitting Mills moved their operations from Kinston to Beaufort, North Carolina. To entice the company into moving, Beaufort citizens purchased a lot and erected a building for company use. Local businessmen further influenced the town to exempt the mill for taxes and electrical payments for the first five years of operation. In July, 1914 the company agreed and erected a factory and worker housing on ‘Knit Mill Hill’ near Shell Road, Beaufort. Local women were employed as workers in the mill; they operated machines which manufactured hosiery and knit goods. The Orion Knitting Mill closed in 1931, and was replaced by a tomato packing plant. In 1934, it again transitioned into Saunders Dry Cleaners.
Source:
Record #:
34737
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mitchell Fulcher was a folk artist well known throughout Eastern North Carolina for his duck decoys. Born on the Core Sound into a small fishing community, Fulcher was employed in a wider range of cottage industries than solely decoy manufacture, including net making, hunting, trapping, and painting. His collection of tools used in net making and fishing is large; it includes many handmade gauges, wooden needles, cork floats, and terrapin gauges. As these goods were produced in industrial factories after 1910, today they are considered folk art collectibles.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p15-16, il, por
Record #:
35871
Author(s):
Abstract:
This feud’s source was not of the Hatfield and McCoy ilk: it was a refinery for Carteret County. Pete Dorrance owned the business he promised was economically sound and environmentally clean. Against it was John Costlow, director of Duke University Marine Laboratory. He asserted a threat of oil spills carried an ecological damage price tag too high to pay.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p14-17