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10 results for Decoy carvers
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Record #:
24498
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild is a group of decoy waterfowl carvers from Harkers Island. The guild began in 1987 and hosts the Core Sound Decoy Festival annually. The mission of the group is to educate new generations about decoy carving through workshops, shows, and demonstrations in order to preserve these skills for the future.
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Record #:
26961
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carolina Decoy Collector’s and Carver’s Association was recently formed, and is dedicated to fostering interest in collecting old waterfowl decoys and waterfowl carving. New collectors in North Carolina can avoid some of the pitfalls of collecting old decoys by learning from other members.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Nov/Dec 1982, p13
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Record #:
31140
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Core Sound Waterfowl Museum celebrates the living traditions of decoy carving, boat-building, and fishing through the documentation and preservation of this Down East community’s cultural history. This article discusses the history of the museum and highlights several new exhibits. This May, the museum moves into its new building at Shell Point on Harkers Island, North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 5, May 2003, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
34737
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mitchell Fulcher was a folk artist well known throughout Eastern North Carolina for his duck decoys. Born on the Core Sound into a small fishing community, Fulcher was employed in a wider range of cottage industries than solely decoy manufacture, including net making, hunting, trapping, and painting. His collection of tools used in net making and fishing is large; it includes many handmade gauges, wooden needles, cork floats, and terrapin gauges. As these goods were produced in industrial factories after 1910, today they are considered folk art collectibles.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p15-16, il, por
Record #:
35558
Author(s):
Abstract:
The craft was wood carving, the objects fashioned duck decoys. For John Sawyer, what started as a hobby grew into what the author called a second occupation. It was a necessary joint business-like venture; John, color blind, left the painting of the decoys to Clara. How it proved to be business like, more hobby than occupation, was proven in their devotion to detail.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p20-21, 38-39
Record #:
35947
Author(s):
Abstract:
Outer Banks residents might be expected to harbor a yen for hobbies signifying fishing village lifeways. The author’s grandfather reflected the rule in model ship building and decoy carving. He could be seen as a model for his models, some featured in accompanying photos. His works gained recognition outside of the Banks by being published in National Geographic in the 1950s and featured in Ben Dixon MacNeill's The Hatterasman.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p28-29
Record #:
36987
Abstract:
Through decoy carving, the man also known as “Brother” upkeeps a local tradition, while up keeping a name for himself in national collections and competitions.
Record #:
35997
Abstract:
Moody Austin’s knowledge known was as a model boat builder and decoy carver. Knowledge collected included trips to Manteo that took a day, dirt roads, and cars as a rare sight. Those days on Hatteras Island were also part of a time when kerosene was the only light source, a schoolhouse accommodated children of all ages, and no businesses.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p36-37
Record #:
38116
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hunting in Eastern North Carolina has shifted its purpose from utilitarian to sport, but one aspect that has not changed is coastal community members, reflected in established surnames such as Cahoon, Garrish, and Swindell participate. Individual participation is reflected in Chase Luker, a Hyde County resident who keeps coastal community tradition alive through hunting related activities such as decoy carving. Descriptions include the label he applies to himself (Southern Outer Banks), his decoy creation approach (great attention to feathery details), and his role models (Wayland Baum, John Williams, and Frank Gaskill).
Record #:
38125
Abstract:
Since the late 19th century, this lake has provided hunting grounds for game birds such as geese, ducks, and swans. It has also provided opportunities for hunting guides, the well-known including John Harold Swindell and Percy Carawan. The hunting continues, albeit without guides, and game birds are in abundance, protected by the Wildlife Commission regulations.