NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Decoys (Hunting)--Outer Banks
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
7551
Author(s):
Abstract:
Truex, a history teacher who resides in Ohio, writes of the duck decoys he found on a trip to the Outer Banks. He discovered Outer Banks' decoys have a lack of refinement in design and are more crudely made than those of other areas. Materials used were mostly regional such as canvas over a wire frame, and discarded sections of power line poles, spars from wrecked ships, and fence posts.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p60-61, il
Record #:
4879
Abstract:
Rough-hewn and homely roothead decoys carved on the Outer Banks are highly prized by collectors who pay thousands of dollars for them. Most were carved before 1918, and carvers between Portsmouth Island and Hatteras Village are credited with their construction and use in the 19th-century. They are called roothead decoys because the carver used natural curves in roots and branches to form decoy heads.
Full Text:
Record #:
36013
Abstract:
Woodworks that became part of the Sea Chest’s “Crafts Curators” collection included decoys and boats carved by Moody Austin and flying birds constructed by Preston Stowe.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p60-61
Record #:
37699
Abstract:
Hatteras Island’s magic is described here almost entirely in photographs. Included are sights such as Honey B, last remaining Banker pony on Hatteras Island; Futuro Saucer Home, second most photographed sight on the Outer Banks; Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, most photographed sight on Hatteras Island; and the restored Oregon Inlet Lifesaving Station, built in 1897.
Source:
Record #:
38116
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hunting in Eastern North Carolina has shifted its purpose from utilitarian to sport, but one aspect that has not changed is coastal community members, reflected in established surnames such as Cahoon, Garrish, and Swindell participate. Individual participation is reflected in Chase Luker, a Hyde County resident who keeps coastal community tradition alive through hunting related activities such as decoy carving. Descriptions include the label he applies to himself (Southern Outer Banks), his decoy creation approach (great attention to feathery details), and his role models (Wayland Baum, John Williams, and Frank Gaskill).