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15 results for Chaplin, Emily [Photographer]
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Record #:
37699
Abstract:
Hatteras Island’s magic is described here almost entirely in photographs. Included are sights such as Honey B, last remaining Banker pony on Hatteras Island; Futuro Saucer Home, second most photographed sight on the Outer Banks; Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, most photographed sight on Hatteras Island; and the restored Oregon Inlet Lifesaving Station, built in 1897.
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Record #:
20858
Abstract:
Shelby, located in Cleveland County, is featured in Our State magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the things not to miss while visiting are the Owl's Eye Vineyard and Winery, Buffalo Creek Gallery, the Carousel and Rotary Train at City Park, NiFen Dining, and the Lily Bean Coffee Shop.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 4, Sept 2013, p40-42, 44, 46, 48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20985
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During the Great Depression, the federal government purchased unused farmland in the Piedmont region. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy named this land the Uwharrie National Forest. It occupies parts of Montgomery, Randolph, and Davidson counties, and it is one of the nation's smallest national forest. It contains a mountain range older than the Rockies or Appalachians and lakes. Perry describes the forest and the people who live in and around it.
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Record #:
21383
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Frank Scibelli opened his first restaurant in Charlotte, Mama Ricotta's, in 1992. When he couldn't find any Mexican food he liked, he opened Cantina 1511, and followed it up with a Tex-Mex--Paco's Tacos & Tequila. For hamburgers he opened Bad Daddy's Burger Bar. When he likes it and can't find it, he builds his own restaurant. Charlotte is not known for traditional barbecue--enter Scibelli and the Midwood Smokehouse. Markovich explains why this is a traditional barbecue place and yet very different.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 7, Dec 2013, p67-68, 70, 72, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21407
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Perry describes the beginnings and growth of the John C. Campbell Folk School which was founded in 1925 by Olive Dame Campbell and named in honor of her husband. Located in Brasstown in Cherokee County, the school offers classes including blacksmithing, pottery, weaving, dyeing, knitting, and dulcimer instruction to over 5,500 students yearly.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 7, Dec 2013, p140-163, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21667
Abstract:
Mims and son Silas take a father-son trip to explore the Outer Banks beach town of Duck. The town has a year-round population of just under 400, but in the summer time it swells to over 20,000. Among the things to see and do there are the Blue Point Restaurant, Duck Donuts, Gray's Department Store, and the Sanderling Resort.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p32, 34, 36-37, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21678
Abstract:
Mims highlights moments in the life of North Carolina's most famous movie actress, Ava Gardner.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p116-120, 122, 124-126, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21819
Abstract:
The Toe River Valley in Marshall and Yancey counties is a hotbed for the arts. The population of the two counties is around 30,000 and of that number it is estimated that more than 500 are artists--one of the highest concentrations of artists in the world. Markovich states there are two reasons for this--Harvey Littleton and the Penland School of Crafts at Spruce Pine. Littleton, who came to Spruce Pine in 1977, gained recognition first as a ceramist and later as a glassblower and sculptor in glass. Penland, founded in 1929 by Lucy Morgan, has gained world-wide recognition as a destination for artists.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p132-136, 138, 140-142, 144, 146, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22104
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Markovich describes the services of the Blockade Runner, an independent beach resort at Wrightsville Beach. This year marks fifty years of providing service to beach goers who just want to relax. The Seashore Hotel opened on the site in 1897 and burned in 1918. It was followed by the Ocean Terrace which was battered by Hurricane Hazel in 1954 and then burned down the following year. The Blockade Runner was built there in 1964, a group of doctors bought it in 1971, and in 1984 the daughter of one of them, Mary Baggett, took over running the place.
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Greenville Times / Pitt's Past (NC Microforms), Vol. 28 Issue 2, January 20 2010, p150-154, 156-158, 160, 162, il
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Record #:
22102
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Miller Pope never planned to own a beach resort. During the war he was an illustrator for the Marine's magazine, Leatherneck. After the war he went to New York and did illustrations for Seventeen and Glamour magazines. Later he had an office on Madison Avenue and was drawing for Time, Life, and Reader's Digest. In the 1950s the family vacationed at numerous beaches looking for a place until one day they came to Ocean Isle and decided \"This is it.\" DeGregory recounts how the Winds Resort Beach Club at Ocean Isle began.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, May 2014, p139-134, 136-138, 140-142, 144, 146, 148, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22106
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Jimmy Pope bought the 22-room Golden Sands Motel at Carolina Beach in 1981. The Center Pier then stretched from the motel over the beach and out into the ocean. In 1996, Hurricane Fran took the pier away right down to the shoreline. Pope built a restaurant and tiki bar on the part of the remaining pier while he continued to expand his motel to 113 rooms. Over the years his interests moved away from the pier and he now leases it to Dave and Abbie Sinclair who operate it from February till cold weather arrives. Now called the Ocean Grill and Tiki Bar, the pier has become a center for beach music band playing.
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Greenville Times / Pitt's Past (NC Microforms), Vol. 28 Issue 2, January 20 2010, p164-166, 168, 170-173, il
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Record #:
22108
Abstract:
Carolina Beach has a special piece of history. The town incorporated in 1925; five years later it built a boardwalk. It's not like other boardwalks with shops and food eateries. This one now sits atop a sand dune with the town on one side and the ocean on the other. It burned in 1940 and the town built it back. A hurricane got it in 1944, and in 1954, Hazel destroyed it along with 350 town buildings. It was rebuilt both times. The question always is \"What do we do about the boardwalk?\" But it always comes back and it always remains \"the boardwalk.\"
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Greenville Times / Pitt's Past (NC Microforms), Vol. 28 Issue 2, January 20 2010, p188-192; 194, 196, 198-199, il
Record #:
22141
Abstract:
A grand estate known as the Whalehead Club stands along Currituck Sound in the shadow of Corolla Lighthouse. The article describes the history of this notable home from its inception to its current use. Built by railroad tycoon, Edward Collings Knight Jr. and his second wife Marie-Louise Josephine LeBel, who was wealthy in her own right, it reportedly cost $383,000, about $4.3 million in today's money. The house was completed in 1925. The extravagant home, located in a remote area, has ties with local fishing and fowl hunting industries.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p80-86, 88, 90-91, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22177
Abstract:
Lying within Mitchell, Yancey, and Avery counties is an area known as Spruce Pine Mining District, \"a 25-mile-long swath of mineral-rich land\" containing emeralds, rubies, sapphires, garnet, kaolin, quartz, mica, and feldspar. Mining in this Appalachian land dates back over 2,000 years to the time when Native Americans were tunneling up to one feet to get mica. Mims recounts the history of mining operations there.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p148-152, 154, 156, il Periodical Website
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