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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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23 results for Boats and boating
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Record #:
2174
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Abstract:
In following the Intracoastal Waterway through eastern North Carolina, boaters have a choice of three routes and a number of interesting stops. Beaufort, Oriental, and Cape Lookout lay along the 450 miles of rivers, sounds, creeks, and manmade canals.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 10, Mar 1995, p25-29, il
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Record #:
3680
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The Coastal Waters Heritage Tourism Council seeks to attract many of the 20,000 boaters on the Intracoastal Waterway to stop along the way and visit historic and cultural sites, including Edenton and New Bern.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p20-23, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3933
Abstract:
Many coastal towns, including New Bern, Swansboro, Morehead City, and Beaufort, welcome in the Christmas season with a flotilla, boats lit with brightly colored lights.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1998, p16-17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4022
Author(s):
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Many people drive over the Intracoastal Waterway on their way to the beach and never give their water route a second thought. What they are ignoring is a dredged navigation channel of 3,000 miles where travelers find historic and cultural sites, explorable rivers, sounds, creeks, and man-made canals.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 1999, p6-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4566
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is a sailor's paradise. Inland lakes, sounds, Intracoastal Waterway, and the Atlantic provide all types of sailing experiences. Novice sailors and master mariners can also hone their skills at a number of sailing schools, including the Water Ways Sailing School at Wrightsville Beach.
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Record #:
5411
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The Intracoastal Waterway connects sounds, bays, tidal rivers, and canals to provide boaters a passage from southern Virginia to Florida. Nickens describes a trip on the 140-mile Great Dismal Loop, which leaves Elizabeth City and goes to Norfolk through the Great Dismal Swamp, then returns through Currituck Sound.
Record #:
7521
Author(s):
Abstract:
Zepke describes seven coastal communities that celebrate the Christmas season with an annual holiday flotilla, boats lit with brightly colored lights. The communities are Elizabeth City, Pleasure Island, Wrightsville Beach, New Bern, Southport, Swansboro, and Topsail Island.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p144-148, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7983
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Abstract:
When California native Chuck McKinnon moved to North Carolina on business, he decided to design a cement boat in his spare time. He had to move back to California before he could finish it, so he left the boat in the backyard of A. D. Cobb in Guilford County because of its proximity to the building site. The boat is forty-five feet long, twelve feet deep, and twelve feet wide, which causes locals to refer to it as the ark. Cobb would love to put the boat in the water, but it was docked on land upside-down.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 53 Issue 2, July 1985, p15, il
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Record #:
11867
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This article about a guide to good boating waters and facilities in North Carolina features a map of the state designating boating grounds that correspond to information given in the boating guide.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 2, June 1961, p23-24, por, map
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Record #:
13137
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Thousands have awakened to the natural opportunities of North Carolina. One of the major breakthroughs of higher standards of living is ownership of a pleasure boat. North Carolina's boating waters are hard to beat, with the Inland Waterway passing through the state to Florida, dozens of rivers, and calming shoals.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 14, Dec 1955, p25, 28, f
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Record #:
13206
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Abstract:
At the recent Tar Heels Afloat Cruise, held in Washington, North Carolina, there were 75 recreational vessels from Ahoskie and New Bern, which reveals an increase in use and ownership of recreational watercraft within state waters.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 9, Sept 1954, p39, 41-42
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Record #:
13291
Abstract:
The 31st Crash Boat Rescue Flight stationed at Southport, North Carolina are conducting a vigorous program of survival at sea and in rescue operations, and are on call 24 hours a day to proceed at once to the scene of a marine disaster or emergency.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 12, Aug 1953, p5, 22
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Record #:
24246
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McAllister Towing of Wilmington Inc. is a three-tug fleet that works to tow ships into port. Overall the company has nine locations in the United States, owning 65 tugboats in total.
Record #:
24445
Abstract:
Shad fishing once boomed along the Albemarle Sound, but only a few locals remember that time or what the boats looked like. This article recounts the significance of this industry in Albemarle County and how it has changed over time.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 10, March 1991, p32-34, il
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Record #:
26457
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Changes have been made to boater registration in North Carolina. The process has been simplified in that boat owners can renew at local agents or by mail, and registrations are now on a staggered basis.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 6, Jun 1980, p8
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