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96 results for Hyde County--History
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Record #:
5220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smith discusses folklorist Bill Mansfield's newest book, SONG OF AN UNSUNG PLACE: LIVING TRADITIONS BY THE PAMLICO SOUND. In it the author documents \"the folklore and folklife of the coastal county's mainland communities.\" Today Hyde County's population is 5,800, only half of what it was in 1990. Mansfield sees this as a concern if traditional ways are to be carried on and preserved. If the children and grandchildren move away, who will continue the old ways.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p12-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
12200
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traversed by Sir Richard Grenville in 1585, Hyde County is speculated to be the first site of conflict between English explorers and Native Americans. The site of an early an 18th-century reservation, Hyde has been transformed into a modern community on the shores of Pamlico Sound.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 7, Aug 1957, p16-22, il, map
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Record #:
23901
Author(s):
Abstract:
Figs have grown on Ocracoke Island for over two-hundred years. The fruit is an important part of island history as well as family memories for Ocracoke residents.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 8, August 2015, p18-19, il
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Record #:
24044
Author(s):
Abstract:
The natural erosion of the Outer Banks concerned citizens and the U.S. government in the 1920s and 1930s. During the Great Depression, the government created the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, which employed 15,000 Works Progress Administration and Civilian Conservation Corps workers. These young men built vegetated sand dunes to protect the beaches and the livelihood of Outer Banks residents.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p41-42, 44, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25202
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Nash recounts the history of the town Gull Rock. Everything from the first settlers to World War II is covered and even pone bread gets a mention.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 12 Issue 4, Summer 1993, p5-6
Record #:
26910
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ocracoke Island residents harvested oysters long before Sir Walter Raleigh’s agents discovered the island. Following the Civil War, however, Ocracokers harvested increasing numbers of the shellfish and nurtured their beds to ensure that there would be plenty of oysters for generations. In 1890, tensions grew between native Ocracokers and outsiders whose dredging practices had virtually destroyed their oyster populations. Eventually, the state passed to protect Ocracoke’s oyster beds from over-fishing.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 12, May 2016, p30, 32, 34, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
34394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two Hyde County residents, Gloria Jennette and Bertha Spencer, highly regarded genealogists and historians, have each spent over twenty years researching their families. Using a variety of records including slave records, they have been able to trace some of their ancestors to the mid to late 1700s and early 1800s. Between the two of them, they possess a mixture of surnames of men and women who lived in various communities throughout Hyde County such as Middleton, White Plains, Nebraska, Slocum, Mount Pleasant and Piney Woods.
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Record #:
35485
Author(s):
Abstract:
Story, in this case, crossed the line between fiction and non-fiction. the author noted that her grandmother Mary Casey was a “walking, talking, history book of the Outer Banks.” More history than story can be perceived in recollections that included references to Daniel Boone and the unsavory early days of Hyde County.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p30-33, 41