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3 results for African Americans--Genealogy
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Record #:
7706
Author(s):
Abstract:
After time with the Army medical corps, banking, and Winston-Salem's Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, a chance encounter created in genealogist Mel White a passion for tracing African American family trees. He gathered data on Happy Hill, an historically African American residential section near Old Salem. This led to a major exhibit, “Across the Creek from Salem: The Story of Happy Hill, 1816-1952,” in The Gallery at Old Salem. In 2005, White left his job at Old Salem to pursue his in interest in African American genealogy. To date, he has built a database containing over 20,000 names.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p98-100, 102, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21347
Author(s):
Abstract:
Within North Carolina and the South in general, it is much more difficult to trace the genealogy of blacks than whites. This is because of the scarcity or nonexistence of the records needed to properly trace a lineage. This is even more apparent when the lineage in question comes from the descendants of slaves. When this is the case, researchers must look at the black family records as well as the white family which were the slave owners. It is much easier to trace the lineage of a free black family.
Record #:
34394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two Hyde County residents, Gloria Jennette and Bertha Spencer, highly regarded genealogists and historians, have each spent over twenty years researching their families. Using a variety of records including slave records, they have been able to trace some of their ancestors to the mid to late 1700s and early 1800s. Between the two of them, they possess a mixture of surnames of men and women who lived in various communities throughout Hyde County such as Middleton, White Plains, Nebraska, Slocum, Mount Pleasant and Piney Woods.
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