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25 results for Oysters
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Record #:
3089
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Abstract:
In the 1890s, the state harvested over 2.5 million bushels of oysters yearly. However, a combination of ecological, economic, and management factors reduced the harvest to 42,000 bushels barely a hundred years later.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1996, p22-24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3344
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Research by Clemson University biologist A.P. Wheeler into how oysters use proteins has been applied by industries in the creation of less harmful products, including biodegradable diapers and environmentally friendly detergents.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1997, p15-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6924
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Oyster Festival, now in its twenty-fourth year, is held in October on Ocean Isle Beach. The festival draws 25,000 people and is a celebration of the coastal life of North Carolina, above and below the water. Activities include an oyster stew cook-off, musical entertainment, shopping, and the popular North Carolina Oyster Shucking Contest.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p192-194, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9389
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The small coastal North Carolina village of Hampstead holds the largely attended Hampstead Oyster Roasts to raise money for various facets of the community. The all-you-can-eat roasts are held on the first Saturdays of the winter months.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p14-16, il
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Record #:
9444
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Disease, overharvesting, pollution, poor water quality, and habitat destruction have caused the Eastern oyster to decline over 90 percent in the state during the last century. Concern for the oyster's future has brought together state agencies like the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries and other state conservation groups to chart a course of action. There is now a statewide plan to save North Carolina's oysters by building hatcheries and recycling oyster shells.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p42-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11503
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Abstract:
The starfish is one of the most recognizable creatures in the state's coastal waters. Oysters inhabiting waters near starfish are in great danger, for the oyster is a prized food.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 36, Feb 1934, p18
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Record #:
16016
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For years the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries has been building oyster reefs from Dare County on the northern coast to Brunswick County on the southern. Miller discusses how it is done and the success of the program.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Feb 2012, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17042
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Leggett discusses how the oyster reigns in eastern North Carolina, from recipes to restaurants.
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Record #:
19343
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With increased development and growing populations, oysters are subject to contamination from human and animal waste. But North Carolina is cracking down on contaminated shellfish with cleaner water and filtration.
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Record #:
23114
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The Daily Reflector's associate editor, Bobby Burns, continues his quest for an appealing oyster dish by preparing traditional oyster stew.
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Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Spring 2015, p15-17, il, por
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Record #:
25050
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At an annual Seafood Quality and Safety Workshop at Pine Knoll Shores, Wayne Mobley teaches people the proper way to shuck oysters and clams. He explains the best way to do this without injuring yourself. Also included are several recipes.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2002, p21-22, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25068
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Abstract:
Seafood companies are looking for new ways to sell seafood. Their best idea is to come up with pre-prepackaged value-added foods that can become a quick lunch or dinner option.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2004, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25164
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Members of the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation gathered for a party involving musical entertainment, oysters, and speeches.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, Spring 1987, p7, por
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Record #:
25188
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Penny Brinkley announces the 6th annual Pamlico-Tar River Foundation Oyster Roast. The festivities the event includes as well as merchandise available are all covered.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p4, il
Record #:
25277
Author(s):
Abstract:
Oysters provide a very important part in water filtration. This role is why the oyster shell recycling program is so important.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Winter 2004, p1, 6, il
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