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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Peters, Sarah Friday
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Record #:
224
Abstract:
Protecting wetlands in North Carolina is especially difficult because different sets of rules govern different types of wetlands.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1992, p6-9, il Periodical Website
Record #:
545
Abstract:
Blue crabs and the blue crab industry are defining aspects of North Carolina.
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Record #:
841
Abstract:
Some present-day NC Indian tribes, especially the Waccamaws, take great pains to preserve their past.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 1992, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
907
Abstract:
Satellite technology is able to assist in coastal research.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1992, p8-12, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1314
Abstract:
North Carolina lighthouses, such as Currituck Lighthouse, Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, and Cape Lookout Lighthouse, have a rich and treasured history for citizens and sailors alike.
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Record #:
1348
Abstract:
A survey of the various dialects heard along the Outer Banks, this article addresses both the unique language patterns and the settlement pattern of the North Carolina coast.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 1993, p12-17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
1682
Abstract:
The wild horses on North Carolina's Outer Banks have spawned debate as to their true origin. The horses roam a 175-mile stretch from the Virginia line to Carrot Island, and face an uncertain future as development encroaches on their habitat.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1994, p2-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2359
Abstract:
Joyce Taylor, seafood education specialist for the UNC Sea Grant College Program in Morehead City, is a recognized expert in seafood handling and preparation who conducts statewide workshops and writes cookbooks and newsletters.
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Record #:
19347
Abstract:
From the hemosponge that takes oxygen from seawater to supported underwater life to a plastic worm that rouses fish taste buds, Joe and Celia Bonaventura are combining marine biology and biotechnology to produce some interesting products at Duke Marine Lab.
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Record #:
19343
Abstract:
With increased development and growing populations, oysters are subject to contamination from human and animal waste. But North Carolina is cracking down on contaminated shellfish with cleaner water and filtration.
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Record #:
19359
Abstract:
In December of 1864 Union soldiers headed for New Inlet in an attempt to seize one of the last Confederate forts that protected the thriving port of Wilmington, but Fort Fisher stood in their way. Peters discusses the construction of Fort Fisher and why it stands today to tell the story of the last major stronghold of the Confederacy.
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Record #:
19360
Abstract:
The best just got better in North Carolina. Recently 200,000 acres of coastal rivers and lakes in the state have been designated as \"outstanding resource waters.\" Seven bodies of water from Alligator River to Masonboro Sound provide extra protections against degradation and promote the maintenance of water quality.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 16 Issue 10, Nov/Dec 1989, p2-3, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
25026
Abstract:
There is more trash in the ocean than we know. Most of that trash is plastic. With new all-time high numbers of plastic waste in the ocean, residents and plastic companies alike are doing their part to reduce those numbers.
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Record #:
2357
Abstract:
Because of pollution and other problems, the Neuse River Foundation in 1993 hired Rick Dove as riverkeeper, to oversee the Neuse. He is the nation's eleventh riverkeeper and the only one in the state.
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Record #:
2541
Abstract:
The North Carolina Coastal Federation, with over 3,000 members and associations like the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation, is one of the most effective environmental advocacy groups in the state.
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