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10 results for Works Progress Administration
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Record #:
15481
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Works Progress Administration provided full-time jobs 20 days a month and seven hours a day with a subsistence wage for every employable household head in American who could not find employment in private industry. The goal: 3,500,000 employable men to be engaged in useful and permanent public works by November 1, 1935.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 31, Dec 1935, p1-2, 22, f
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Record #:
16853
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Historical Records Survey, part of the Works Progress Administration, hired unemployed clerks, stenographers, and teachers to catalog and protect public records in an effort to aid historians, archivists, and curators. The program ran for five years between 1935 and 1940 and operated out of Raleigh. One hundred and ten workers were given the task of focusing on information from the clerk of court and register of deeds from the state's 100 counties.
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Record #:
17126
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through July 1940, the total expenditures on Works Progress Administration projects in North Carolina was $104,397,911, of which 26.7 percent was contributed to by the sponsoring state agencies, cities, towns, and counties. The work was performed on a wide range of endeavors, construction and non-construction, from adult education to public buildings, highways, National Guard armories, and bridges.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Sept 1940, p4, f
Record #:
17390
Abstract:
Twenty-two people began a comprehensive record collecting project in October 1936 as one of the Works Progress Administration's initiatives. New Hanover records from the city-county identification bureau, the county auditor, the city-county board of heath, the register of deeds, and the clerk of court were compiled into a searchable database.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 3 Issue 7, Apr 1936, p13, il
Record #:
19755
Abstract:
The survey began on February 13, 1936 as part of the Works Progress Administration and was operated through the North Carolina Historical Commission. Reviewed in this article are details concerning the survey including; agencies from which records were reviewed, recruitment of qualified workers, and the budgetary considerations to complete work. The author also makes recommendations for the organization, management, and preservation of these collected from federal agencies across the state.
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Record #:
19933
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article describes the contents of the archives of the office of register of deeds in North Carolina based on the detailed catalogues created by The Historical Records Survey, a Works Progress Administration project begun in North Carolina in 1936 and still underway at the time of press. The article provides a history of the office of register of deeds and highlights records or groups of records of interest.
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Record #:
21097
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Politics were involved in Harry Hopkins's selection of George W. Coan Jr. as a compromise candidate for North Carolina Works Progress Administration chief. The Roosevelt administration owed favors to North Carolina's senators, Robert L. Doughton and Josiah Bailey. Doughton and Bailey favored conservative candidates and opposed certain liberal political rivals, but Coan Jr. was eventually agreed upon by all parties.
Record #:
21396
Author(s):
Abstract:
A look at the active role played by The Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the 1936 election in North Carolina. The WPA directed patronage and relief moneys to benefit candidates it supported in the Democratic primary for the US Senate seat, the Democratic gubernatorial primary, and the regular elections in the 9th congressional district, and support was contended for by several factions within the party.
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Record #:
24044
Author(s):
Abstract:
The natural erosion of the Outer Banks concerned citizens and the U.S. government in the 1920s and 1930s. During the Great Depression, the government created the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, which employed 15,000 Works Progress Administration and Civilian Conservation Corps workers. These young men built vegetated sand dunes to protect the beaches and the livelihood of Outer Banks residents.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p41-42, 44, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16140
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Abstract:
The Blue Ridge Parkway began as a Public Relief Project during the Great Depression. The objective was to supply jobs for destitute North Carolinians and to link Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountain National Parks. Once approved by President Roosevelt, debates erupted over the proposed route the parkway would take.
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