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29 results for Beaufort--History
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Record #:
191
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Abstract:
The hurricane of August 19, 1879, destroyed the Beaufort waterfront and razed the Atlantic Hotel.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 10, Mar 1992, p14-15, il
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Record #:
4960
Author(s):
Abstract:
Turnage gives a brief look at what was happening in New Bern, Beaufort, and Bath on the eve of the American Revolution.
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Record #:
5949
Abstract:
Beaufort in Carteret County is the state's fourth oldest town. Faulkner discusses the town's history and architecture. A walking tour map identifying historic sites and a map of the town plan from 1713 are included.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, May/June 1975, p5-10, il
Record #:
5970
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jean Kell, who was doing research in the North Carolina State Archives, discovered a new and unknown chapter in the state's history. One year after Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown and before the peace treaty was signed, the last battle of the Revolutionary War was fought at Beaufort in Carteret County in April 1782. Kell recounts the battle which ended just seven years, lacking a day, from the opening battle on April 18, 1775.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p10-14, il
Record #:
8072
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Great Depression, the United States government provided funds through the Public Works Administration to hire unemployed workers. One program funded by the PWA was the Federal Arts Program. In 1940, the Federal Arts program commissioned Simka Simkovitch to paint four murals in the new Beaufort post office. These four paintings depicted the Town of Beaufort's heritage and included pictures of wild horses, Canadian geese, the “Orville W” and the Beaufort lifesavers rescuing members of the “Crissie Wright.” While the murals are today a part of Beaufort, local residents have no memory of the Russian artist. Commissioned to paint these scenes, Simkovitch spent only a few days in Beaufort before returning to his studio in Connecticut, later sending the paintings back to Beaufort.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
12884
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Abstract:
Surveyed and plotted in 1713, Beaufort has served as a popular spot for North Carolina natives as well as visiting tourists for centuries. A focal point during the Civil War, Beaufort is home to attractions such as the Hammock House as well as a U.S. Fishery Biological Laboratory.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 6, Aug 1959, p16-18, il
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Record #:
13450
Abstract:
Johns Hopkins University established a seaside biology laboratory in Beaufort in 1880, long before the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries created their biological station. An account of this work is found in the 20 November, 1880 issue of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, documenting the existence of the laboratory and the variety of sea life found in Beaufort waters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p12-13, il
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Record #:
14097
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Abstract:
Charles Ives describes some of the interesting things about Morehead City and Beaufort's early history.\r\n\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 3, June 1949, p8-9, 20, f
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Record #:
14341
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Abstract:
Two hundred years ago, a fleet of Spanish privateers entered the Beaufort harbor and seized and held the town for several weeks. So far as is known, Beaufort is the only North Carolina town over which the Spanish flag has flown.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Aug 1947, p5
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Record #:
20907
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This article examines the first permanent colonies established in North Carolina and the settlement that became Beaufort. Article details land patents, area trade, town layout, town incorporation, Lord Proprietors relations, real estate speculation, land transfers, population growth, resident occupations, justice system, religion, land surveying, and period maps are included.
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Record #:
21208
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This article archives the growth of Beaufort, North Carolina between its founding in 1713 and the end of the colonial period in 1782.
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Record #:
24514
Abstract:
This article discusses the New Atlantic Hotel that opened in 1889 in Morehead City, which replaced the one that was washed away during a storm in 1879.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 12, May 1978, p16-19, il
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Record #:
24508
Abstract:
The Old Atlantic Hotel built in 1859 in Beaufort, North Carolina was located on the waterfront; many locals wondered if the hotel could survive a storm. The hotel eventually collapsed during a storm in August 1879.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 11, April 1978, p12-13, il
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Record #:
24554
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Reid recounts his boyhood in Beaufort, North Carolina, paying specific attention to sailing in the region.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 7, December 1973, p14-15, por
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Record #:
24636
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Abstract:
An old burying ground at Beaufort has been in use since the early 1700s and sheds light on the history of the area. The grave is the final resting place of such historical figures as Col. William Thompson (1736-1781) and Captain Otway Burns (1775-1850).
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 18, February 1959, p11, 20, il
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