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21 results for Outer Banks--Description and travel
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Record #:
8422
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The author recalls family trips to visit his grandparents in Buxton. Goodwin's grandfather, James Oliver Casey, was a keeper of the lighthouse. Among his responsibilities was maintaining the light, which included carrying five gallons of kerosene to the top of the lighthouse each day. Goodwin remembers catching ferries across the inlet and driving across sand to Buxton. There were no roads at that time, and drivers were careful to avoid quicksand. If travelers were in trouble, the Coast Guard offered quick assistance. At his grandparent's home, Goodwin enjoyed large family meals that usually included seafood, such as fresh-caught fish, crabs, oysters, and scallops. The Outer Banks have changed since Goodwin's childhood. During the Great Depression, for instance, the Civilian Conservation Corps built dunes along the island and planted trees to stabilize the island's continuously shifting sands.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 12, May 1985, p19-21, il, por
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Record #:
9341
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Although they look unified on a map, the barrier islands known as the Outer Banks are part of three separate counties--Currituck, Dare, and Hyde. Wright describes the offerings travelers will find on a visit there.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 6, June 2007, p38, 40,, il
Record #:
12345
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N.C. Highway 12 runs through the Outer Banks for 148 miles. Harrison describes things to see and do along the route.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 1, June 2010, p114-120, 122, 124, 126, 128, , il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12783
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No longer restricted as places to visit in the summer, beach resorts are becoming more popular as year round homes. The same social clubs, churches, and organizations available to inland folk are more available in beach towns, drawing in a larger number of semi-retired or retired persons. Specifically mentioning Kill Devil Hills, Kitty Hawk, and Nags Head, the author notes the downsides as well as benefits of living on North Carolina's Outer Banks.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 22, Mar 1963, p8-9, 22, il, por
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Record #:
13893
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Different in many respects from any other section of North Carolina, the outer strip of coastal counties has an individuality and appeal that is all its own.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 3, June 1950, p3-5, 20, map
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Record #:
15238
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Goerch details a car trip along the eastern edge of North Carolina from the tip of Currituck County down to Cape Hatteras. Along the way they take in the sights of shipwrecks, the Coast Guard service, ferry boats at Oregon Inlet, fishing in Currituck Sound, the lighthouse on the cape, and the quaint villages of Avon, Hatteras, and Duck.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 27, Dec 1939, p1-7, 22, map, f
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Record #:
18135
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Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found on and near the Outer Banks, including Southport and Bald Head Island.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 26, Nov 1940, p1-5, 28, il, por
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Record #:
23873
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From historic towns and ports to pristine beaches, Carteret County's Crystal Coast in the Southern Outer Banks presents the tourist with a wide variety things to do and places to go.
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Record #:
23915
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In the summer of 2014, researchers deployed data-logging drifters to track the direction of rip currents on the North Carolina coast. The study had two objectives: discover a way to better predict rip currents and determine whether swimmers caught in rip currents should swim or float.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2015, p6-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24438
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Bird watching is making a comeback on the shores of the Outer Banks. About 400 varieties of birds have been documented on the Outer Banks, and the Audubon Society’s Pine Island Wildlife Sanctuary is home to many of them.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 12, May 1993, p24-26, il
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Record #:
24659
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This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the Northeast coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Kill Devil Hills, the Outer Banks, and the Albemarle Sound.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p33-37, il
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Record #:
25099
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A new series of trails is in the process of development along the Outer Banks National Scenic Byway. Each trail will have a different theme and will follow a variety of areas along the Byway. In addition, preparations for the annual Mountains to the Sea ride. This is a weeklong biking expedition that will stop in a variety of towns from Edenton to Manteo.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2014, p28-29, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25101
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Abstract:
The beaches of the Outer Banks are constantly changing as the waves reshape the land. By the turn of the next century, Ocracoke Island may even be underwater due to such changes. However, the constant transformation of the landscape does not take away from the beauty of the land, nor North Carolinians’ affection for it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p154-156, 158-159, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6004
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Each year the number of tourists visiting the Outer Banks increases. Crowds flock to Hatteras, Nags Head, and Duck, and Corolla has become \"the mecca of the well-heeled tourist.\" However, beyond Corolla lies what is called the Corolla Outback, a place of Spanish mustangs, wild pigs, and sand dunes that swallow stands of trees, traversed only by a four-wheel drive vehicle. Manuel takes the reader on a tour of this Outer Banks spot few vacationers get to see.
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Record #:
28530
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The damage Hurricane Matthew did to Hatteras Island is documented. Residents describe how they are dealing with the storm’s destruction. The weather pattern that caused the catastrophic flooding is also detailed.