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5 results for Goat farmers
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Record #:
3351
Abstract:
Goat cheese is growing in popularity in the state. Two goat farms, Goat Lady Dairy in Randolph County and Celebrity Dairy in Chatham County, produce fresh goat cheese, while Pittsboro's Dancing Doe Dairy is licensed for aged cheese only.
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Record #:
23805
Abstract:
Three Days Grace is a family-owned goat farm in Madison County that helps bridge the gap between farm and table and provides locally-produced milk and cheese to the community.
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Record #:
25103
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botanist and part-time goatherd, Jamey Donaldson, started herding on Roan Mountain in 2008 in an effort to preserve the naturally occurring balds. Balds are treeless areas found on mountains, but due to the absences of goats and other grazing animals, the existence of such balds are threatened by tree growth. Donaldson discusses the importance of preserving balds and his efforts to bring goats back to these areas on Roan Mountain.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p174-178, 180, 182, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
31206
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Abstract:
A group of North Carolina goat meat farmers formed the Franklin County Goat Producers’ Co-op to promote raising and selling goat products. Goat meat, also called chevon and cabrito in Spanish, appeals to the diverse ethnic population that is growing in North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 8, Aug 2002, p26-27, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35773
Abstract:
The author asserted the home, with grounds declared a historic site by the Federal Government, belied significance on many levels. Personal significance was illustrated in the builder naming the house after a town in Ireland. Personal significance can be perceived in the appreciated beauty of Western North Carolina that encouraged the Sandburgs’ move from Michigan. As for its historical significance, that can be gauged in its construction during the antebellum period and the original owner’s position as treasurer for the Confederacy.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p54