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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for Farmers
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Record #:
402
Abstract:
African-American farmers losing their land has become an all-too-common occurrence.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1980, p3-8, il
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Record #:
1734
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In the 20th-century North Carolina saw a meeting of agriculture and industry, which gave rise to a hybrid occupation called farmer/peddler. Industry created ways for farmers to peddle their products, thereby raising the farmers' standards of living.
Record #:
4041
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Abstract:
Over the years, three groups have farmed the land. The first group was subsistence farmers, who raised animals and crops for their own needs. The second group, the planters, saw farming as a way to make money. The last group did not own the land, but worked it, and included indentured servants, slaves, and tenant farmers.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 38 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p16-18,20, il
Record #:
10617
Abstract:
On October 19, 1970, Governor Robert W. Scott and Commissioner of Agriculture James A. Graham will honor more than 700 Century Farm Families at the N.C. State Fair. The families, who have maintained ownership of family farmland for more than 100 years, will be served lunch and receive a certificate signed by Governor Scott and Commissioner Graham. Additionally, each family will be guests of the fair for the evening show at Dorton Arena and a permanent plaque listing all of the families by county will be installed at the fairgrounds.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 7, Sept 1970, p18, 27, il
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Record #:
13628
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Abstract:
Mr. Ernest P. Sauls started out as a one-horse farmer in Panther Branch Township, Wake County. Now he is a master farmer, owns 12 farms, cultivates 600 acres, and drives a Cadillac.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 16, Sept 1951, p3-4
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Record #:
20891
Abstract:
The author uses farmers in the Cape Fear Valley to support conclusions of historian Manning J. Dauer, who analyzed the presidential election of 1796. This article looks at the connection between wealthy farmers in the area and their support of Federalism. Looking at this region and its demographics, the author compares Dauer's conclusions about Federalists and the Republican loss in the 1796 presidential election.
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Record #:
24578
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Elmo Tant owns Elmo’s Pumpkin Farm in Franklin County. He decided to grow pumpkins to diversify his tobacco farm in the late 1960s and now provides pumpkins for Halloween carving.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 10, October 1971, p10-11, il
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Record #:
25295
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The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation has given awards for conservation to local farmers. They two winners both farm large amounts of land but still manage to keep conservation a priority.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 24 Issue 4, Fall 2005, p1, por
Record #:
16115
Abstract:
The subject of this article is Mr. Vassie Hill who recounts growing up near Whaleyville at the turn of the century. He shares experiences about farming, attending school at Mars Hill School, and the general hardships of growing up in rural North Carolina during this period.
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Record #:
26740
Abstract:
Located in Warren County touching the border with Virginia, Ridgeway is one of the lesser-known food capitals of North Carolina, and some of their principle cantaloupe farmers are the Holtzmann family. The Holtzmann family even have documents related to cantaloupe shipments associated with the 1939 meeting between President Franklin D. Roosevelt and King George VI.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p146-152, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16210
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The state's farmers suffered greatly during the Great Depression because this group had already experienced difficulties in the decade before. Governors O. Max Gardner and J.C.B. Ehringhaus were charged with providing aid to this especially destitute demographic. Several New Deal programs targeted the plight of farmers like the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA) the Resettlement Administration (RA).
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Subject(s):
Record #:
27780
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Abstract:
Helga and Tim MacAller own Four Leaf Farm in Rougemont and grow an unusual crop for North Carolina. The MacAller’s grow kiwi and supply local restaurants and farmers market with the fruit. Due to Hurricane Sandy and colder weather, the crop has not been good this year. The MacAller’s experiences growing the fruit are detailed.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 45, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
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Record #:
28056
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The Crop Mob is a group of farmers without farms who spend one Sunday each month helping out on small farms in rural Orange and Chatham counties. The group has been a part of why the number of small farms in the Triangle area has increased over the last decade. The group is made of mostly young farmers and activists and the group has gained national attention for their work.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 42, October 2009, p35-36 Periodical Website
Record #:
31153
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Abstract:
Wilson Daughtry grows Mattamuskeet Sweet Onions at his Hyde County farm, Alligator River Growers, in eastern North Carolina’s “blacklands”. The flavor and texture of this sweet onion variety depends on the climate, weather and peat soil near Lake Mattamuskeet. The onion is high in demand due to its short growth period in June and July.
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