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7 results for African American farmers
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Record #:
402
Abstract:
African-American farmers losing their land has become an all-too-common occurrence.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1980, p3-8, il
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Record #:
3925
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Abstract:
Timothy Pigford of Bladen County has been in the forefront of a legal struggle against the Farmers Home Administration. His suit charges that the agency discriminated against black farmers by denying loans or making loan acquisitions more difficult than for whites. Now, after two decades, the government must choose between settling out of court or facing a $3 billion class action suit.
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Record #:
5935
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1910, the U.S. Department of Agriculture listed nearly one million black farmers, who owned 15 million acres, about 14 percent of the nation's farmland. Today black farmers number 18,000 nationwide and collectively own less than 1 percent of all farms. North Carolina has been especially hard hit, losing between 1982 and 1992, more black farms than any other state in the union. Jackson discusses reasons for this decline.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 20 Issue 30, July 2003, p22-24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14653
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Speaker of the House of Representatives Mr. Tom Pearsall was elected in at the beginning of 1947. He was adamant about instituting a health program not for the state but limited to his personal estate. Pearsall was in charge of M. C. Braswell Farms, an expansive estate which stretched 22,000 acres between Nash and Edgecombe County. The farm was run by 900 individuals, mostly African Americans, and to ward off disease and illness Pearsall insisted on preventive health procedures, like chest X-rays to check for tuberculosis.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 36, Feb 1947, p3, 18, il
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Record #:
14659
Abstract:
Jim Camp was a successful African American farmer in Cleveland County. Though he started life as the son of a poor farmer, through hard work and determination he would attain one of the largest farms in Cleveland County. In 1947, he owned a 785-acre farm that produced cotton and grain and a sawmill that processed the 300 acres of wood. His energy went beyond farming to teaching, and he opened a school, as well as his home, to help educate underprivileged African American children.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 39, Feb 1947, p8, 38
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Record #:
28505
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Abstract:
Supervising, tending, and harvesting the tobacco crop was a non-traditional role for African-American women in the 1960s. Mildred Keaton recounts how her mother and many black women she knew managed small tobacco farms as their husbands worked full-time jobs in Bladen and Columbus counties. Keaton and Estella Graham’s stories highlight the many roles African-American women played in tobacco farming, from planting to hauling the cured leaves to market.
Record #:
34370
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1930s and ‘40s, black farmers settled in rural Halifax County to farm under a program that originated as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. The Tillery Farms Resettlement project aimed to compose a percentage of blacks in the farming population, improve their economic prospects and make them self-sufficient, and stabilize the larger agricultural economy that collapsed during the Depression. More than two-hundred black families have owned farms in Tillery, and generations remain on the land they worked.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2018, p84-90, por, bibl Periodical Website
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