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10 results for African American women
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Record #:
2182
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jennifer Bobo, an assistant professor of communication studies at UNC-CH, has an experimental audience of black women view or read black cultural works, including the film DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST, then interviews them to determine their reactions.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Nov 1994, p15-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24951
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pauli Murray was indeed a woman ahead of her time. She became the first African American student at Yale Law School to earn a JSD and the first African American woman to be ordained as an Episcopal priesthood.
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Record #:
28103
Abstract:
Miss Charlotte Rhone was a founder and the third president of the Climbers Club of New Bern, a non-profit organization of African American women. Rhone was also the first black registered nurse in North Carolina and the first black social worker in Craven County.
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Record #:
28162
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Climbers Club of New Bern was organized in 1921 by nine prominent African American women. The club’s purpose was to unite New Bern citizens by sponsoring activities for women, and to encourage things that make citizens a better and broader group of people.
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Record #:
28505
Author(s):
Abstract:
Supervising, tending, and harvesting the tobacco crop was a non-traditional role for African-American women in the 1960s. Mildred Keaton recounts how her mother and many black women she knew managed small tobacco farms as their husbands worked full-time jobs in Bladen and Columbus counties. Keaton and Estella Graham’s stories highlight the many roles African-American women played in tobacco farming, from planting to hauling the cured leaves to market.
Record #:
28610
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Durham Hosiery Mills were among the first to use black labor in the southern textile industry. Black women who worked for the Durham Hosiery Mills as skilled workers blazed a trail for later African American workers who battled racist and sexist practices in the twentieth century. The history of African American millhands, their hiring, and the motivations of millowners for hiring them are detailed.
Record #:
29035
Author(s):
Abstract:
Black Mama’s Day Bail Out was a national action to free black mothers who were in jail on bonds they could not afford to pay. Mothers released from the Durham County Detention Facility were celebrated at Hillside Park on Mother’s Day. Social activists at the event are calling for reform of North Carolina’s racially biased ransom demands.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 18, May 2017, p8-9, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36037
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stepping is an African American dance and performance tradition unique to African American Greek communities. Dating back to the 1930s, it developed from pledges marching in line as part of their initiation into the Greek organizations. Creating step routines parallels the important African American feature of songs, which is lyric sampling. Like lyric sampling, new stepping pieces are created by borrowing pieces of other routines and making improvisations.
Record #:
36035
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Theta Pi chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority at UNC Chapel Hill, along with other African American organizations, uses stepping as a creative vehicle that helped to define group image through words and movement.
Record #:
36439
Author(s):
Abstract:
After finding a journal that belonged to his grandmother from 1951-52, the author was able to devise what daily life was like for an African American woman.