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16 results for Social movements
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Record #:
15782
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Since the morning of Saturday, October 15, a group of citizens from Chapel Hill, Carrboro, and other towns have encamped at the Peace and Justice Plaza in front of the post office on East Franklin Street. They are Occupy Chapel Hill, the local offshoot of the Occupy Wall Street movement.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 43, Oct 2011, p9, f Periodical Website
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16043
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Twenty protestors, known as Carrboro Commune, gathered in front of a building on Greensboro and Weaver streets in Carrboro. Their protests were incited by plan to build a 24-hour CVS pharmacy and office space, instead of a community center serving the citizens. Demonstrations ended peacefully when Mayor Mark Chilton negotiated with the group.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 6, Feb 2012, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25797
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Wendy Wolford studies economic inequality and poverty rooted in Brazil’s land politics. After World War Two, policies forced farmers and rural workers into the Amazon and cities. Brazil’s Landless Movement is now pressuring the government to create settlements with farmland.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Fall 2007, p28-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25813
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Sociologist Charles Kurzman studies Iranian revolutions and social movements. His recent study of Iranian attitudes toward gender equality shows that a majority of Iranians are feminists. This finding is a sign that Iranian society may be evolving away from an extreme revolutionary ideology.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Winter 2008, p43-46, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27009
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The search for a new male image, one which does not ignore recent history but also celebrates being a man, is at the heart of a new movement among men in the 1980s. Doug Jennette, a Raleigh therapist and president of the Men’s Center of Raleigh and Wake County, leads a group focused on helping men express their feelings and improve their lives through emotional support and community.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 3, Feb 9-22 1989, p7-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27020
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Thousands showed up in downtown Raleigh to participate in the 10th Annual Moral March, as part of the Historic Thousands on Jones Street (HKonJ) movement. The purpose was to empower all who were present to organize and mobilize for active engagement in the voting process. They are concerned about the moral state of politics and people who have been harmed by extremist policies.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 7, Feb 2016, p8, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28757
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Thousands of people gathered in Raleigh, North Carolina to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump. This issue of Indy Week presents stories about this burgeoning movement, from the inauguration protests to the women’s marches.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Jan 2017, p15-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28799
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Famed Nigerian chef Tunde Wey visited Durham last week as part of his Blackness in America pop-up dinner series, an event which combines dinner with discussions of race. Wey’s timely visit sparked meaningful conversation within the Durham local food movement.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 49, Dec 2016, p17-18, por Periodical Website
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28949
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Hours before a federal judge halted President Donald Trump’s refugee ban Saturday, thousands gathered in Raleigh to protest in a rally. Speakers who addressed the crowd talked about a number of issues surrounding current policies, ethnicity and race.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 4, Feb 2017, p8, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28956
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Moogfest, a music festival which takes place in Durham for the second time in mid-May, will feature a protest stage. The current volatile political climate made “Protest” an obvious theme choice for 2017. The festival is also working with local activists and social justice groups to give urgency to current issues and social change.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 5, Feb 2017, p22, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29016
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The Art of Cool Festival, which celebrates is fourth year in Durham, presents and promotes jazz to local audiences as well as helping foster jazz education among young musicians. Despite funding struggles, community support has kept the festival strong. This year the festival will feature prominent speakers on social justice and what citizens can do to fight oppression.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 15, April 2017, p24-25, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29036
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Moogfest, in its second year in Durham, features a protest stage and other progressive themes. The music festival promises a space where artistic expression can be channeled to incite action for social justice. At the same time, Moogfest is eager to be a beacon for the affluent, tech-minded entrepreneurs flooding Durham's rapidly expanding start-up community.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 18, May 2017, p12, il Periodical Website
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29035
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Black Mama’s Day Bail Out was a national action to free black mothers who were in jail on bonds they could not afford to pay. Mothers released from the Durham County Detention Facility were celebrated at Hillside Park on Mother’s Day. Social activists at the event are calling for reform of North Carolina’s racially biased ransom demands.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 18, May 2017, p8-9, por Periodical Website
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29037
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The second year of Durham’s Moogfest focuses on grassroots musical activism, and features music-related forms of social protest. The festival opens with Moor Mother, an experimental music project led by Camae Ayewa. A self-described Afrofuturist, she uses music and lyrics to fight against oppression.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 18, May 2017, p13-14, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30942
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25-year-old Raynisha Caldwell decided to organize a peaceful protest march in her home town of Mooresville, and was met with a viral internet backlash of complaints, warnings and even death threats. When she arrived at the police department that was overwhelmed with calls from concerned citizens against the march, she was surprised by the level of support that was offered. With roughly 200 people of various races participating alongside the Mooresville police department and Iredell County Sheriff's Office, the march happened peacefully.