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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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14 results for Habitat (Ecology)
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Record #:
4744
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Early-successional habitats are areas of a mountain forest that are beginning to recover from events like fires, storms, or logging. First come grasses, then shrubs, and finally trees. All of these stages are important to wildlife survival. Earley discusses the value of early-successional habitats for mountain wildlife, their growing rarity, and what steps are being taken to maintain them.
Record #:
5113
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The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh contains thousands of specimens and skeletons of fish, amphibians, and invertebrates. Items date from 1890 to 1999. Green discusses the various collections and how scientists use them to reveal habitat information.
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Record #:
1079
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The new book, \"North Carolina WILD Places: A Closer Look,\" surveys the various types of natural habitats existing in North Carolina, from mountains to coast and places in between.
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Record #:
1345
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The ruffed grouse, a common gamebird in western North Carolina, faces an uncertain future due to environmental conditions, loss of habitat, and various other factors.
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Record #:
28388
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The Diana fritillary (Speyeria diana) is a forest-dwelling butterfly of high conservation concern in North Carolina. Observations of the Diana fritillary butterfly are reported in a burned oak-pine forest in the Bald Mountains of North Carolina. Burning may be an important management tool for enhancing the habitat of this species.
Record #:
28305
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A comparative ecology study of turtles inhabiting five golf courses and five farm ponds was conducted in the western Piedmont of North Carolina. Results indicate that both farm and golf course ponds can provide habitat for semi-aquatic turtles, and that the surrounding landscape can influence species abundances.
Record #:
28269
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East coast barrier islands such as Kiawah Island, South Carolina serve as critical habitat for endemic diamondback terrapins, which are particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic disturbances. A radiotelemetry study provides new insight to understanding terrapin habitat use and site fidelity.
Record #:
28309
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Pine voles are rodents found in the Eastern part of the United States, and occupy a range of habitats including dry hardwood forests and orchards. A study conducted on pine voles in Henderson County, North Carolina found that reproductive success, pup survivorship, and pup growth did not differ between different types of habitat.
Record #:
28335
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A planarian is one of many flatworms of the Turbellaria class. Four freshwater planarians were found during the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Notes on field observations and habitats are presented to discuss the four species’ behavior in natural settings.
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Record #:
28336
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The blue ghost firefly (Phausis reticulata) is a lampyrid beetle found in the southern Appalachians, observed primarily in May and June. Its behavior and habitat were observed at several locations in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and South Carolina from 1997 through 2008.
Record #:
28570
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With the projects described, land owners can welcome more wildlife onto their property. Some easy projects to help welcome wildlife include creating a mini food plot, creating brush piles, cutting standing softwoods, creating an early successional area, girdling non-masting trees, and leaving standing den trees. The importance of planning, directions how to complete each project, and which types of wildlife will be attracted by these projects are all detailed.
Record #:
28769
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Wildfire plays an important role in North Carolina’s ecology. Fires remove plant litter and return nutrients to the soil stimulating new plant growth, expose food sources, and remove layers of forest litter so seeds can grow, increase light to the forest floor, maintain open grassy areas, and help create and maintain a diversity of forest structure and composition. Fire is an important part of nature’s cycle and one of nature’s ways of recycling. The relationship between fire and the environment in North Carolina is detailed.
Record #:
36201
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The presence of pollinators is of increased concern for scientists, gardeners, and farmers, due to decreased pollinator populations worldwide. For a pollinator friendly garden, the author recommended flowers preferable to pollinators such as Passion vine, Milkweed, Coneflower, and Dahlia. Other factors to consider are a protective environment and ample water sources.
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Record #:
36204
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Environmental disasters and habitat destruction have encouraged some homeowners to open up their yards to house affected wildlife, especially pollinators, through organic landscaping and wildlife- friendly food sources. Growth factors include region and hardiness. For food, the author recommends trees such as the Mulberry and Dogwood and shrubs such as Holly. Examples of plants fit for consumption include honeysuckle and milkweed.
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