NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Plants, Useful
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
12587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Documented by French explorers as early as 1564, as well as by Thomas Harriot, and John Lawson, Yaupon, a shrub of the Holly family that naturally grows between Virginia and Florida, was used, in the past, by Native Americans and eventually, Europeans, for a variety of purposes. Producing small red berries that can either be medicinal or decorative, Yaupon, has therapeutic qualities which reportedly, restores lost appetites, strengthens the stomach, offers agility and courage to those preparing for battle, and also serves as an emetic. In addition, Yaupon contains a high caffeine content and was used and traded as tea or a tea additive during the Colonial Period.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 1, June 1962, p11, 56, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29086
Author(s):
Abstract:
An agave Americana plant in Historic Oakwood served as a botanical landmark for twenty-five years until it was cut down last Wednesday. Agave is typically used to make tequila and mescal, but this plant will become beer. A collaboration between Raleigh mezcaleria Gallo Pelón and Bond Brothers Brewing Company of Cary plan to make two beer styles out of the agave.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 25, July 2017, p18-19, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
29844
Abstract:
Nutritionists in Asheville, North Carolina are teaching people how to forage for edible foods in the wild. Wild Abundance, a wild food, homesteading and primitive skills school, says better nutrition comes from eating wild produce, mushrooms, plants and weeds. The process of foraging develops independence and increases flexibility and variety.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
36201
Author(s):
Abstract:
The presence of pollinators is of increased concern for scientists, gardeners, and farmers, due to decreased pollinator populations worldwide. For a pollinator friendly garden, the author recommended flowers preferable to pollinators such as Passion vine, Milkweed, Coneflower, and Dahlia. Other factors to consider are a protective environment and ample water sources.
Source:
Record #:
36199
Author(s):
Abstract:
This type of garden can nourish all, by lowering harmful insect populations and maintaining pollinator populations. Plants nourishing for farm animals include Artemisia and marigold. Examples of plants nourishing for humans are sponge gourd and sheep sorrel. Plants discouraging pests are bay laurel and mint. Plants good for insects include spicebush and dill.
Source:
Record #:
36195
Author(s):
Abstract:
For gardeners seeking green thumb level success, the author offered information types of plants: open pollinated; hybrid; and genetically modified organism. She discussed each type’s characteristics and how OPs, hybrids, and GMOs can affect a garden’s productivity.
Source:
Record #:
36204
Author(s):
Abstract:
Environmental disasters and habitat destruction have encouraged some homeowners to open up their yards to house affected wildlife, especially pollinators, through organic landscaping and wildlife- friendly food sources. Growth factors include region and hardiness. For food, the author recommends trees such as the Mulberry and Dogwood and shrubs such as Holly. Examples of plants fit for consumption include honeysuckle and milkweed.
Source: