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7 results for Mushrooms, Edible
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Record #:
7247
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Bill Burk, the botany librarian at the Couch Biology Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, discusses the morel mushroom. This mushroom is an elusive delicacy that cannot be purchased in most grocery stores and it is particular about its habitat. It won't grow if it's too hot, too dry, too wet, or too cold. People seek it from Oregon's mossy forests to North Carolina's hardwoods. Restaurant gourmands know that morels promise an aromatic meal, but they come with a danger. Morels have imposters, and these imposters can kill. To dine safely, ask an expert.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8809
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Bob Padgett began collecting and eating mushrooms while living in the Shenandoah Valley. At first, the neighborhood children were hesitant about collecting mushrooms; however, as the author continued to eat mushrooms without getting sick, the children became interested in the hobby. Many people know that some mushrooms are poisonous to humans, but few know which ones these are. Almost all poisonous mushrooms belong to the family Amanita. Before one begins collecting mushrooms for consumption purposes, they should be familiar with which species belongs to the Amanita family. The neighborhood children soon became knowledgeable and even got their families hooked on eating wild mushrooms.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983, p14-15, por
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Record #:
24571
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The morel is a mushroom that shows up in North Carolina for only two weeks in spring. The author discusses searching for and harvesting this highly sought-after mushroom.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 22, April 1972, p11-12, il
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Record #:
29844
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Nutritionists in Asheville, North Carolina are teaching people how to forage for edible foods in the wild. Wild Abundance, a wild food, homesteading and primitive skills school, says better nutrition comes from eating wild produce, mushrooms, plants and weeds. The process of foraging develops independence and increases flexibility and variety.
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Record #:
29848
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The Appalachian Mountains house a rich diversity of fungi, some of which produce abundant fruits that are naturally healthy and delicious. No Place Like Home, an Asheville-based tour company, offers guided hikes teaching people how to identify and harvest edible wild plants and mushrooms. Local mushroom clubs and mycological suppliers, such as Asheville Fungi, help people cultivate a variety of mushrooms at home.
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Record #:
31053
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There is a rising interest among North Carolina farmers in growing shiitake and other edible mushrooms to supplement income, and to promote its health benefits. Although most mushrooms are non-poisonous, North Carolina hosts several species that potentially could cause death if eaten. This article discusses how to identify and grow mushrooms, as well as where to buy fresh mushrooms, and mushroom nutrition.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 9, Sept 2007, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36157
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A forest food spotlighted was the Golden Chantarelle, a variety of fungus. Described in detail were its five hundred year foraging history, distinctive features, and medicinal properties.