NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Butterflies
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4124
Author(s):
Abstract:
In April 1999, the Magic Wings Butterfly House opens. Located at Durham's Museum of Life and Science, the house is the first of its kind in the region and will contain approximately 1,000 butterflies representing 200 species from all over the world.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 4, Apr 1999, p6, il
Record #:
5079
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to a colorful array of butterflies of all shapes and sizes, with habitats stretching from the Appalachian Mountains to the Coastal Plains wetlands. Over 160 species have been documented. Of these only Saint Francis satyr is listed as an endangered species. With a little time and patience people can learn there are more butterfly colors beyond the familiar orange and black of the Monarch.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Airlie Gardens is a virtual paradise of almost 70 acres owned and operated by New Hanover County, on the eastern edge of Wilmington on Bradley Creek. It boosts 100,000 azaleas and some 50,000 camellias, and now a new butterfly house.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
21863
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are about 175 species of butterflies in the state. The eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly is perhaps the most recognizable with its yellow body with black stripes and a wingspan between three and six inches. In 2011 Frances Parnell and the Cape Fear Garden Club, Inc. of Wilmington began lobbying the NC General Assembly for a North Carolina Butterfly Symbol, and in June 2012 the eastern tiger swallowtail was so named.
Source:
Record #:
24015
Abstract:
Nina Veteto has always loved nature and is now a teacher and environmental educator. She strives to inform others about the importance of monarch butterflies and suggests ways for locals to boost native populations of butterflies, ensuring their continued existence in the region for years to come.
Source:
Record #:
25518
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seventy-five percent of the more than 650 North American bird species migrate twice per year. With the help of radio transmitters, scientists know much more about these long journeys.
Full Text:
Record #:
25523
Abstract:
This article describes how two projects have expanded beyond their early support from the North Carolina Sea Grant. On the southern coast of North Carolina, a new species of butterfly, the crystal skipper, makes its permanent home within a 30-mile stretch of sand dune. People-First Tourism, Inc., (P1t) creates an online marketplace where the public has direct pathways to vetted microentrepreneurs.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2016, p12-19, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
13866
Author(s):
Abstract:
Swallowtails are North Carolina's largest butterflies, and seven species live within the state. They are the pipevine, tiger, spicebush, black, zebra, palamedes, and the giant swallowtail. Swallowtails inhabit all regions of the state.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
14061
Author(s):
Abstract:
The St. Francis' satyr is an endangered butterfly that lives only in the artillery impact zones of Fort Bragg in Fayetteville. It was discovered in June 1983 by an off-duty soldier who happened to be an amateur insect collector. In 1995, the butterfly was listed as an endangered species. Biologists are working on a plan to rescue it.
Full Text:
Record #:
28388
Abstract:
The Diana fritillary (Speyeria diana) is a forest-dwelling butterfly of high conservation concern in North Carolina. Observations of the Diana fritillary butterfly are reported in a burned oak-pine forest in the Bald Mountains of North Carolina. Burning may be an important management tool for enhancing the habitat of this species.
Record #:
28515
Author(s):
Abstract:
A transmission right-of-way near North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation’s Hamlet power plant will become a part of the state’s Butterfly Highway next spring. A one-acre plot was prepared with pollinator-friendly plants native to the state. This is part of a statewide conservation initiative aiming to restore habitats impacted by urbanization, land use change and agriculture.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
30646
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spring in North Carolina is an ideal time for gardeners to attract butterflies. This can be done by planting native flowering, nectar-producing plants that attract mature butterflies, and plant foliage that attract young caterpillars. This article provides a guide to gardening, native plants and species of butterflies.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Mar 2014, p22-23, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
31290
Author(s):
Abstract:
Power line cuts and cleared rights-of-way offer some of the best habitat North Carolina butterflies can find. Paul Hart, superintendent of Raven Rock State Park, has spotted nearly ninety butterfly species in the park. Power line cuts serve as great habitat areas because they are sunny, maintained, and create ecologically-important, species-rich zones.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 7, July 1999, p17, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):