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11 results for Housing--Charlotte
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Record #:
359
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Federal- and state-funded housing projects and renovations are underway in Charlotte.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 2, Aug 1982, p22-26, il
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Record #:
23527
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After the recession, Charlotte homebuilders lead the way in buying cheap land and selling new house. Tamara Lynch discusses marketing techniques in the south.
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Record #:
28568
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Charlotte’s housing market has rebounded in the past ten years, but homes are short in supply and prices are rising. Current trends beg to question if Charlotte’s housing market is heading for another crash.
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Record #:
29138
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A major issues with Charlotte, North Carolina's urban transformation is the availability of affordable housing, particularly for those who help make the city's expansion possible. Amongst the skyscrapers and restaurants, city planners estimate that Charlotte needs more than 34,000 additional affordable housing units to meet current demand. The city is making various attempts to to address the problem, with varied success.
Record #:
31443
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Policy experts explain how they would address four of the main factors that contribute to Charlotte’s lack of economic mobility, and one major philanthropist talks about how to give back.
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Record #:
31458
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Should you rent or buy? Where? And what about all this talk of a downturn? Two experts, Daren Blomquist, vice president at the real estate analytics firm RealtyTrac , and Allen Tate Co. President and CEO Pat Riley weigh in on the issue.
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Record #:
31467
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Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build now reaches across the globe, but the first home is still in Charlotte, and the first owner still lives there.
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Record #:
34439
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There are fewer homes for sale in Charlotte, and the prices have risen above average. Recent increases in the market have been driven by the city reemerging as a destination for new residents, many of which are post-college millennials arriving for entry-level professional jobs. The tightened market may be leading to a new wave of growth in the suburbs.
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Record #:
34440
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Moore’s Sanctuary is an African-American community in the west side of Charlotte, and its foundation has existed for 148 years. As the City of Charlotte faces a shortage in affordable and workforce housing, developers are looking to acquire property in the west side. Rickey Hall, founder of the West Side Community Land Trust, hopes to purchase land and ensure longtime west-side residents have a place to live as land values increase.
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Record #:
34442
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McCrorey Heights is a neighborhood of about two-hundred ranch-style homes in northwest Charlotte where many of the major local civil rights accomplishments were born. Development and road construction threatens McCrorey Heights and the area’s history, while displacing many of the residents in the neighborhood.
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Record #:
36313
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Unemployment related factors discussed were housing insecurity and transportation struggles. Such factors, coupled with low wage jobs, can create a cycle of poverty hard to escape and easy to perpetuate. Such factors also ranked Charlotte on the bottom of a Harvard University-sponsored economic mobility study. On the upside to this downward spiral were individuals such as Traletta Banks, an instructor showing others how to break the cycle with options such as creating career pathways. Also part of the effort was Economic Mobility Initiative, a nonprofit helping individuals on the road to self-sufficiency overcome roadblocks such as benefits cliff.