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14 results for Parks
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Record #:
1855
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Morris offers a glance at five state parks that characterize North Carolina's diverse geography: Lake Waccamaw State Park, Pettigrew State Park, Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve, Stone Mountain State Park and Crowders Mountain State Park.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 4, Sept 1994, p20-25, il
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Record #:
3258
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Forests and parks across the state rank nationally in the top ten in hiking activity. Among the most popular are Grandfather Mountain, Uwharrie National Forest, Lake Brandt, and Portsmouth Island.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 1997, p2-6, il
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Record #:
3829
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Stone Mountain, sitting astride the Wilkes-Alleghany county border, is an immense granite dome, the largest in the state. Four mining companies planned to mine it. None succeeded. In 1969, it became a state park of 13,700 acres, second largest in the state. Climbers come from all over the world to challenge the mountain's south face.
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Record #:
7215
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The North Carolina State Park System started on March 3, 1915, when the North Carolina General Assembly established Mount Mitchell as the first state park. Today there are twenty-nine state parks covering over 250,000 acres of land and water and featuring a variety of geography, plant life and wildlife.
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Record #:
8650
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A recent addition to the state parks system, the Hemlock Bluffs in Wake County attract a large number of visitors. Discovered in 1971, the area is approximately three acres in size and is the only place south and east of the Appalachians where native hemlocks grow. The temperature in the bluff area is about ten degrees lower than surrounding areas, a perfect temperature for hemlocks to grow. A partial listing of 113 wildflowers growing in and around the bluffs was compiled by Rodney Flint.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 2, July 1981, p12-13, 37, il
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Record #:
10123
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In 1946, the North Carolina State Park System could only claim two that met park criteria--Morrow Mountain and Hanging Rock. Other parks consisted of the Great Smokey Mountain National Park and some city parks. Pearse compares the state's park system to other states, like South Carolina, which has eighteen, and Tennessee, which has sixteen. Why North Carolina has so few is discussed and there are recommendations for a ten-year plan to develop state parks.
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Record #:
11156
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Pittard describes parks in three of North Carolina's largest cities where residents can find a quiet space amid the hubbub of city life. They are Pullen Park (Raleigh), Freedom Park (Charlotte), and Center City Park (Greensboro).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p98-102, 104, 106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14475
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Hiwassee State Park, containing 800 acres and a number of buildings, has been created through lease of part of the old TVA village by the NC Division of Forestry and Parks. It will be open to recreational seekers with moderately priced furnished cottages available.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 46, Apr 1948, p3-4, f
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Record #:
23990
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Shapiro discusses things to do in Carrier Park, West Asheville, such as biking, basketball, picnicking, and hiking
Record #:
3740
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For a change of pace while vacationing, families can visit a state park or wildlife refuge. A number of sites, including New River and Pea Island, provide opportunities to learn about an area's plants, animals, climate, and geology.
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Record #:
27753
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The various groups who saved the Dorothea Dix Hospital property from development have received a Citizen Award from IndyWeek. Dix 306, Friends of Dorothea Dix Park, and the Dix Visionaries, among others, lobbied for the Dorothea Dix Hospital property to become a new city park in Raleigh. The park is now being planned and may include a concert pavilion, amusement rides, walking and bike trails, and a museum in the original hospital building.
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Record #:
27798
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Residents of Durham are fighting for control of Old North Durham Park. The 3.6 acre park is home to the only public soccer field in downtown Durham, but many some want to change that. The Friends of Old North Durham Park has presented a master plan for proposed changes to the park. Opponents dislike the plan and say the group intends to gentrify the park and disrupt the local center of community life. There is some evidence the city has neglected the park and many Latino residents feel as if there voice is not being heard on the issue.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 15, April 2011, p7, 11 Periodical Website
Record #:
32217
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The Land of Oz is a new theme park located on Beech Mountain at Banner Elk in Western North Carolina. The opening of Oz this year climaxed years of thought, planning and work by the late Grover Robbins and his brother Harry, plus many others who were recruited for the project. The park features all the scenes and characters from Frank L. Baum’s, “Wizard of Oz.”
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