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16 results for Hazardous waste sites
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Record #:
763
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina, as well as the Southeast, search for a low-level radioactive waste site by 1996. More than likely the Triangle area will be chosen.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 32, Aug 1992, p7-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3207
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brownfields are underused or abandoned commercial or industrial sites that could be used profitably except for on-site contaminants. Several Charlotte redevelopment projects have overcome obstacles. State and federal governments foster such efforts.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 2, Feb 1997, p20-21, 25-28, il
Record #:
3599
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brownfields are underused or abandoned commercial or industrial sites at which on-site contaminants adversely affect potential profitability. Fayetteville and High Point are working with the EPA to see how to revitalize such rundown sections.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 2, Feb 1998, p42-43, il
Record #:
4057
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before a brownfield, an underused or abandoned commercial or industrial site having contaminants, could be used, the site had to be totally cleaned up. Liability for the old pollution rested with the new owners. The Brownfield Property Reuse Act of 1997 removed that liability from potential developers.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Jan 1999, p11
Record #:
4065
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brownfields are underused or abandoned industrial or commercial sites having contaminants that affect potential profitability. Sites could not be used unless totally cleaned up; new owners could be held liable for any pollution problems from the old site. The Brownfields Property Reuse Act of 1997 is more flexible in its approach to usage and removes these restrictions from potential developers. While the law removes major impediments, dangers of contaminants may still exist.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 64 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p2-11, il, f
Full Text:
Record #:
5922
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brownfields are underused or abandoned commercial or industrial sites at which on-site contaminants adversely affect profitability. Lail discusses the North Carolina Brownfield program that \"gives a potential buyer the ability - without liability - to take a neglected, contaminated site and make it a safe and clean property and economically viable property.\"
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 53 Issue 7, July 2003, p4-5, il
Record #:
25155
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of the biggest refuses for hazardous waste can be found in your own home in the form of wood polish, paint, paint remover, cleaning agents and many other culprits.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Fall 1986, p3, 5
Record #:
25181
Author(s):
Abstract:
The possibility of a hazardous waste incinerator near Oxford has been repeatedly delayed by residents of the area who are strongly against its construction.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1990, p2-3
Record #:
26664
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is making progress in preventing, reducing and treating new hazardous waste. However, little progress has been made in solving pre-existing problems of abandoned or inactive hazardous waste dumps. Waste from these dumps may be seeping into groundwater and threatening our drinking supply.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1986, p12, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
27353
Author(s):
Abstract:
Debate is taking place over a proposed hazardous waste disposal facility to be built by ThermalKEM in rural Northampton County. The residents of Woodland and the black community are split over the decision. The opposition is concerned about public health, corporate promises, and property values while the group in favor of the facility says it will bring jobs to an area with high unemployment, little tax revenue, and community services.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 37, September 11-17 1991, p7-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27567
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Shiloh Coalition for Community Control and Improvement’s fight for clean water and responsible local industry has earned them regional and national recognition. The EPA recognized the group for getting people to act after the Beazer Company leaked chemicals into area groundwater. The group has managed to put public pressure on the company and the company is paying for town access to city water. The group is praised for its excellent example of cooperation among residents toward a common goal. , especially between black and white citizens.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 37, November 16-22 1989, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27730
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke Energy will dump 12 million tons of coal ash across the street from a Sanford trailer park. Duke Energy did not have to notify residents or ask local leaders for permission to do so or conduct a study to determine potential harm to human health and the environment according to state law. Planning for the site has been underway for months by Duke Energy and many local citizens and leaders are frustrated they were not made aware or allowed to voice concerns.
Source:
Record #:
27741
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke Energy has contracted with Green Meadow LLC to take possession of its coal ash. If the ash contaminates the environment at its new dump sites, Green Meadow LLC would be responsible for the mess, not Duke. If Green Meadow LLC cannot pay the fines, then the state and local residents will be responsible for cleaning up the mess. Residents of Moncure, NC, Chatham County, and Lee County are all concerned with the ethics of the deal and the site of the ash dump. The details of the proposed plan and its effects are discussed in-depth.
Source:
Record #:
31396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Storage of nuclear waste is becoming a serious problem in North Carolina. A new bill sets a timetable for establishing a permanent underground storage facility for high-level nuclear waste by the mid-1990s, and provides for temporary federal storage of nuclear waste in the meantime. Plans will also be developed to construct man-made “monitored, retrievable storage” (MRS) sites.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 4, Apr 1983, p18-20, il Periodical Website
Record #:
33351
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many of today’s groundwater pollution problems result from improper waste disposal. This article discusses the issue in North Carolina and presents a new approach to site selection and construction of hazardous waste disposal sites.