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37 results for Asheville--History
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Record #:
1146
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Abstract:
Timblin profiles the city of Asheville, past and present.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 2, July 1993, p22-25, il, por
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Record #:
8896
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There is a legend in Asheville that surrounds the Biltmore Estate. George Vanderbilt constructed his mansion during the 1890s. The project brought jobs to the region and all residents were happy, almost. One refused to sell his land. That mountaineer wanted to keep his property because it was had been his family's land for over three generations. The gentleman held onto his property until his death. Reprinted from the April 1, 1968 edition.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p18-19, por
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Record #:
12627
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In an excerpt from Ziegler and Crosscup's 1881 travel book, \"Heart of the Alleghenies,\" the authors relay mountain farming opportunities beyond the Blue Ridges. Ziegler and Crosscup suggest using Yankee methods to let mountain fields lay fallow every few years, and comment on the Watauga, the highest county of the Appalachians, some areas located 6,000 feet above sea level.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 4, July 1958, p10
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Record #:
13443
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Asheville's new and unusual visitor attraction, the Colburn Mineral Museum, was started with the collection of the late Burnham S. Colburn totaling over 500 pieces. Now housing more than 2,000 minerals, the collection features many stones native to North Carolina, including Hiddenite, a rare mineral found only in Alexandria County. Among the oddities of stones is a piece of flexible sandstone able to bend at an angle.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p28-29
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Record #:
22144
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Quoting from the writings of two men connected closely with the city--Thomas Wolfe, a native, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, a visitor, Kruse captures the feel of Asheville during a period of American excess--the 1920s--followed by the crash of the 1930s.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p92-96, 98, 100, 102, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22495
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In 1898, the wedding of Lieutenant Robert P. Johnston and Alexandra Mary Garrett made the front of the local newspaper. The happy occasion was celebrated at the Garrett home, now the Smith-McDowell House on Victoria Road in Asheville. This period account describes the decorations and the bride's unusual cake, historic features of interest to those planning a modern wedding.
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Record #:
23615
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Manikowski discusses various prominent female historical figures from the Asheville area, such as Lillian Exum Clement Stafford and Elizabeth Blackwell.
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Record #:
23633
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In the late 1800s, Asheville was home to a thriving community of Jewish store owners, who helped to shape the city into a thriving business center seen today. Clausen discusses some of the more prominent members of the time, including Solomon Lipinsky, a keen businessman and town leader.
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Record #:
23803
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WNC Magazine presents two-hundred years of growth in Asheville, North Carolina with special attention paid to the cityscape and historic structures, as well as past important events that took place in the city.
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Record #:
23924
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The intersection of Patton and Lexington Avenues is home to one of Asheville's most historic corners. The northwest corner was the site of the Grand Central Hotel during the nineteenth century, the Bon Marche department store from 1910 to 1923, and the S.H. Kress & Co. 5-10-25 Cent Store through 1975.
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Record #:
24003
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Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24001
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Joyce Kilmer was an American poet, writer, and Sergeant, and is remembered in this article that details his impressive scouting operations into dangerous territory and his subsequent death in 1918 at the hands of a German sniper.
Record #:
24011
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The Mountaineer Inn is an icon in Asheville; it sprang up after WWII and became a popular motel that is still privately owned today.
Record #:
24024
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The author traces various artistic interpretations of Western North Carolina's landscapes since the 18th century, focusing primarily on William Bartram, who traveled throughout the area in 1775. The painter and botanist observed customs and traditions of the Cherokee, publishing his accounts as 'Travels' in 1791.
Record #:
24072
Author(s):
Abstract:
Vance Monument pays tribute to Zebulon Vance (1830-1894), the governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. Vance was also later a United States Senator.