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9 results for Hurricane Hazel, 1954
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Record #:
8169
Abstract:
Hurricane Hazel hit eastern North Carolina in October 1954. Rocky Mount native Phyllis Casper recalls her Hazel experience. She and her husband prepared for the worst when hearing of Hazel's approach. Many, including her Aunt Lossie, did not. Schools opened that day, but soon local radio stations told parents to pick up their children. Waiting out the storm in her house, Casper read comic books. Following the storm, residents ventured outside to find a wake of destruction with fallen trees and damaged homes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p2, por
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Record #:
10300
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Parker makes an appraisal of the damage to North Carolina beaches caused by Hurricane Hazel. He does not give a monetary estimate, but instead describes the general condition of the beaches and the prospects for rehabilitation.
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Record #:
17036
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Graff describes Hurricane Hazel, one of the most powerful hurricanes to strike North Carolina. It came ashore October 15, 1954, on the North Carolina/South Carolina line with wind speed of 150 MPH. In the state nineteen people were killed and two hundred were injured. Damage was in the millions.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p46-52, 54, 56-61, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
25113
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It is important to educate people on the hazard that even a Category 1 hurricane can present. Hurricane Hazel was, in particular, a very nasty storm and defied certain aspects of what science says a hurricane should do.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2014, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25112
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Abstract:
Hurricane Hazel was one of the worst storms in history. Many people who survived the storm recount their memories of the destruction and devastation to the coast.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2014, p6-15, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
1951
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Hurricane Hazel was one of the most destructive storms to strike the North Carolina coast in the last few centuries. October 15, 1994, marks the 40th anniversary of this powerful storm.
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Record #:
30438
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Abstract:
North Carolina's beaches are witnessing rapid clean up and rebuilding after Hurricane Hazel. Although property damage was extensive on larger and smaller beaches, the general condition of the beaches is looking good. Most beach activities are returning to normal, and fishing is again drawing thousands of visitors to the coast. Beach residents, hotel managers, and lodges are hoping that fishing tourism will also aid in restoring and rebuilding some of the more damaged components.
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Record #:
37942
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How to improve the iconic boardwalk, destroyed twice by hurricanes and once by a fire, has been a problem inspiring many possible solutions since the 1940s. Over the decades, the issue has continued to be on any city election platform and inspired the creation of the Carolina Beach Boardwalk Preservation Association. The author infers the oft-asked question “what do we do about the boardwalk?” needs answering, since the boardwalk built in 1930 is as much a part of a Carolina Beach summer as the beach.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p188-192, 194, 196-199 Periodical Website
Record #:
38274
Author(s):
Abstract:
The house originally owned by Sarah Green Jones and Pembroke Jones and its gardens have served many purposes for former owners and the community. It has weathered storms, entertained locals, hosted the Azalea Festival, and provided healing for the battle-scarred youngest son of the Corbett family, who moved in the house in 1948. Though the house is gone, its gardens is very much present. Now a popular visitation spot for people of all ages, Airlie Gardens offers live music, bird walks, and educational programs for schoolchildren throughout the year.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 9, Feb 2012, p170-172, 174-176 Periodical Website