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17 results for Barnes, Jay
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Record #:
4160
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Before Hurricane Fran, Hazel was one of the most powerful storms to strike the state. The beaches of Brunswick County were hardest hit. Huge waves driven by 150 mph winds swept away hundreds of buildings. At Long Beach only 5 of 357 buildings survived. In the ensuing years Hazel was the benchmark against which other storms were measured.
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Record #:
5737
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Since the late 19th-century, over 60 hurricane strikes have been recorded in North Carolina. Barnes describes five memorable ones: the hurricane of 1879; San Ciriaco, August 16-18, 1899; Hurricane Hazel, October 15, 1954; Hurricane Fran, September 5-6, 1996; Hurricane Floyd, September 16, 1999.
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Record #:
6745
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Hurricane Floyd was the worst natural disaster in the history of North Carolina. Two weeks after Hurricane Dennis dropped ten inches of rain, Floyd dropped another 26 inches on September 15 and 16, 1999. Severe flooding resulted, with damages reaching $6 billion, 60,000 homes flooded, and fifty-two deaths. The authors interviewed over fifty people in seventeen counties for their book, \"Faces From the Flood: Hurricane Floyd Remembered.\" Excerpts are presented in the article.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 5, May 2004, p10-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
9084
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Ocean piers have a long history in North Carolina. The first one was built at Wrightsville Beach in 1910, but was destroyed by fire ten years later. The oldest pier still in operation is Kure Beach Pier which was built in 1925. The number of piers peaked at 36 in 1980. In 2007, only twenty remain. Hurricanes caused the loss of some, but accelerated development on the barrier islands, especially Bogue Banks, is the main reason for closing piers. The price of beachfront property is soaring, and pier owners are selling to the developers. Barnes discusses a number of these vulnerable, wooden structures and why they hold such a special place in the memories of the people who visit them.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 2, July 2007, p36-38, 40, 42, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11391
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North Carolina has a long history of windmills dating back to the 18-century. Carteret County had the most with over 65 of the total of 155 documented ones found along the coast. Today, with emphasis on clean energy, new wind projects are under consideration along the mountain ridges and the coastal areas.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 3, Aug 2009, p32-34, 36, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11958
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Reports of strange creatures roaming the woods and countryside of North Carolina and committing violent acts have existed for over a hundred years. Barnes describes some of them, including the Bladenboro Monster and the Santer Cat that terrorized Iredell and Wilkes Counties in the 1890s.
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Record #:
13716
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In the late 19th century, Buffalo City in Dare County was a thriving logging town, but by the 1920s the area's useful timber was about depleted. That was when the town was revived by a new industry -- moonshine whiskey.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 10, Mar 2011, p36-38, 40, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1951
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Hurricane Hazel was one of the most destructive storms to strike the North Carolina coast in the last few centuries. October 15, 1994, marks the 40th anniversary of this powerful storm.
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Record #:
7358
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The high winds and flooding of the Great Storm of 1899 drove residents of Shackleford Banks and Ca'e (Cape) Banks from their homes forever. Survivors migrated to Morehead City, Harkers Island, Marshallberg, and Salter Path where they built new homes and continued their community traditions. The original settlers arrived in the 1700s and by the mid-1800s, the population of the banks had reached around eight hundred. Life revolved around whaling and fishing. In 1999, six hundred descendants of the settlers gathered on the banks to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the storm.
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Record #:
11121
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Over the years many celebrities, politicians, and sports stars have visited North Carolina to take advantage of many sporting activities. These include Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and George Herbert Walker Bush, baseball players Babe Ruth and Ted Williams, and famed sharpshooter Annie Oakley.
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Record #:
11334
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Barnes describes the effects powerful hurricanes, like Fran and Floyd, have on North Carolina's wildlife.
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Record #:
13863
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North Carolina is close to the top of the charts each year in the number of persons bitten by snakes. Copperhead bites are the most common, and fortunately for the person bitten, the least dangerous. Between 1977 and 2005, only two people died from a snake bite in the state.
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Record #:
16682
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North Carolina is the second most-dangerous state for lightning strikes, averaging eleven flashes per square mile each year. Florida ranks first with twenty-five flashes. Barnes defines lightning and identifies the common types and lists ways to avoid being struck.
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Record #:
27331
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Twenty years ago, Hurricane Fran was North Carolina’s most destructive storm to date. Reflecting on past storms can help prepare residents for future storms and forgetting can be costly.
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Record #:
30930
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Author Jay Barnes revisits hurricane Fran twenty years later. This article is composed of excerpts from Barne's 2013 book, NORTH CAROLINA'S HURICANE HISTORY. Hurricane Fran made landfall on September 5, 1996 at Bald Head Island as a category 3 hurricane.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2016, p6-13, il Periodical Website