NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Natural disasters--Planning
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
3090
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricane Fran's 1996 blow across the state brought not only destruction to a number of towns and cities, but also a swift response to the emergency by local governments.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 46 Issue 12, Dec 1996, p1,8-9, il
Record #:
25525
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the U.S. Geological Society (USGS) advanced efforts to improve storm-surge data gathering and understanding. Data collection has made a tremendous leap from measuring post-storm watermarks on buildings to implementing more accurate gauge-based measurements.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2016, p32-36, il, por, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25842
Author(s):
Abstract:
East Carolina University will house the Chapel Hill-based Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) database designed to store information about the region’s coastal areas. The project provides research about human systems and physical processes through collaboration and high performance computing and visualization.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2007, p6 Periodical Website
Record #:
27331
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twenty years ago, Hurricane Fran was North Carolina’s most destructive storm to date. Reflecting on past storms can help prepare residents for future storms and forgetting can be costly.
Source:
Record #:
34257
Author(s):
Abstract:
On September 5, 1996, North Carolina was hit by Hurricane Fran, the most destructive hurricane ever to strike the state. To prepare for future natural disasters, Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. issued an Executive Order establishing the North Carolina Disaster Recovery Task Force. The task force was charged with making sure resources for recovering from Hurricane Fran were used efficiently and with making recommendations for responding to future disasters.
Record #:
34363
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new Emergency Operations Center for North Carolina and a state emergency response fund to be tapped during hurricanes and other natural disasters are urgent necessities identified by the Joint Study Committee on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management Recovery. Eleven legislative proposals are being introduced during the General Assembly short session to fulfill these needs.
Record #:
34361
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given the experiences in North Carolina over the past decade with devastating hurricanes, there is concern over the protection of water supplies and how the state should respond to natural disasters, accidents, or contamination. This article discusses policies and emergency management in North Carolina.
Record #:
34364
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina experienced a string of debilitating natural disasters over a five-year period beginning with Hurricane Floyd in 1999, and the response to some of these crises is still ongoing in many places. Government leaders and industries are cooperating to try to fix the policy and planning failures that exacerbated damages. Revised, comprehensive floodplain mapping is one of the preventative actions that emerged as a direct result of Hurricane Floyd.
Record #:
35309
Author(s):
Abstract:
This illustrated guide, produced by FEMA and the Red Cross, provided weather disaster related advice such as how to secure home and family members and survive through a supply kit.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 4, April 2015, p14-15